New Year's Resolutions

As Sarah pointed out -- New Year's resolutions are as time-honored a tradition as New Year's hangovers. i i

hide captionAs Sarah pointed out — New Year's resolutions are as time-honored a tradition as New Year's hangovers.

Dan Woods/Flickr
As Sarah pointed out -- New Year's resolutions are as time-honored a tradition as New Year's hangovers.

As Sarah pointed out — New Year's resolutions are as time-honored a tradition as New Year's hangovers.

Dan Woods/Flickr

It goes without saying — and yet, I have to say it in order to actually start this blog post — it is really hard to keep a New Year's resolution (see: Congress).  That road is paved with gym memberships and single diary entries.  A friend of mine makes intensely practical ones, and I'm trying to learn from her example — "put sunglasses back in case," etc.  So far, I've been able to find my keys every day in 2011.

But it is still tempting, and probably character building, to think about the visionary resolutions; to go beyond the organizational and into the truly inspirational.  Learn something new, be kinder, call home.

So, in hopes of marrying the two kinds of resolutions, I've come up with this one as well — read the Times Literary Supplement's "Poem of the Week." It's such a lovely little gem; a short intro, and than a poem, and it hardly takes five minutes to read.  It doesn't have the maudlin voice and music of certain other recurring writerly media — ahem — and it's not daily, so it's a little easier to fit it into your deadlines.  I love the little intros, and it's well curated.  Go read this week's entry, and than be introduced to this wonderful word, which isn't even in the poem: "tatterdemalion." (Not to mention "Brueghelian allegory.")

And may all your resolutions be a little poetic, and a little practical.

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