January 24th show

President Obama i i

President Obama addresses troops at a rally during a surprise visit to Bagram Air Field in Afghanistan in December 2010. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Photo hide caption

itoggle caption Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Photo
President Obama

President Obama addresses troops at a rally during a surprise visit to Bagram Air Field in Afghanistan in December 2010.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Photo

Getting it Right
After the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and 18 others at a shopping center in Tucson, AZ, some news organizations, including NPR, falsely reported that Giffords had died of gunshot wounds. Host Neal Conan talks with Dick Meyer, NPR's executive editor for news about the error, and with New York Times public editor Arthur Brisbane and Kelly McBride, ethics group leader for the Poynter Institute about the challenges of prioritizing accuracy in breaking news situations.

Opinion Page
Republicans took control of the House of Representatives by campaigning for smaller government, but some say the House itself is not big enough. The average representative in the 112th Congress represents more than ten times as many constituents as their predecessors did in the first Congress of 1787. Northwestern University political scientist Dr. Jacqueline Stevens tells Neal Conan why it's time to add onto the House.

"The Violence of Peace"
President Barack Obama may have campaigned as a peace candidate, but he has largely accepted President George W. Bush's principles on war, and in some cases expanded them. So writes Stephen Carter in his new book The Violence of War. Carter, a law professor at Yale, explores the Obama Doctrine of war, and joins host Neal Conan to discuss President Obama, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the history of just war theory.

Keith Olbermann
With two years left in his contract with MSNBC, Keith Olbermann abruptly split with the network during his show last Friday. Olbermann is largely credited with defining the voice of MSNBC as one of its most outspoken broadcasters, but apparently will have to keep quiet about his departure. Host Neal Conan will talk about the sudden on-air announcement that Olbermann and MSNBC have been planning to part ways for weeks.

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