February 14th Show

The Budget i i

President Barack Obama's 2012 budget, released on Capitol Hill today, proposes to trim $90 billion from government spending, and has targeted several popular government programs for cuts. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images
The Budget

President Barack Obama's 2012 budget, released on Capitol Hill today, proposes to trim $90 billion from government spending, and has targeted several popular government programs for cuts.

Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Why Egypt Matters

The ruling Egyptian military has dissolved the Parliament and constitution: two key demands of the protesters who forced the resignation of former President Hosni Mubarak. We've seen the celebration in Cairo, but how does it affect the United States? Guest host Rebecca Roberts will speaks with guests about why they think Americans should care.

The Opinion Page: Fannie and Freddie

The Obama Administration has outlined a plan to abolish government-backed mortgage providers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Now, policy makers are debating how much of a role the government should have when it comes to dealing with mortgages. In a piece for The New York Times, columnist Gretchen Morgenson asks whether new proposed financial entities wouldn't have the same problems that brought Fannie and Freddie to their demise. Guest host Rebecca Roberts talks with Morgenson about her piece, "Imagining Life Without Fannie and Freddie."

How We Age

Nursing homes are sometimes dismissed as "God's waiting room," the place where the clock ticks as the elderly wait to die. In his new book, How We Age, geriatric psychiatrist Marc Agronin writes that these perceptions of old age exist because of the "failure of our own creativity and willingness to conceive that life up until its last moments has its own ways and meanings." Guest host Rebecca Roberts talks with Agronin about his new book and his experiences as a doctor to the aged.

The Federal Budget

This morning President Obama released his federal budget for next year — all $3.7 trillion of it. Before it was even out, Republicans in Congress were saying it does not go far enough to cut the deficit. The battle over the 2012 budget has officially begun. NPR senior Washington editor Ron Elving joins guest host Rebecca Roberts to explain where the process goes from here.

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