History Repeats Itself, In Photos

This photo was taken sometime in the 1910s. I wonder what the boy and girl would look like now if they recreated this photo today... i i

This photo was taken sometime in the 1910s. I wonder what the boy and girl would look like now if they recreated this photo today... Beverly & Pack/flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Beverly & Pack/flickr
This photo was taken sometime in the 1910s. I wonder what the boy and girl would look like now if they recreated this photo today...

This photo was taken sometime in the 1910s. I wonder what the boy and girl would look like now if they recreated this photo today...

Beverly & Pack/flickr

Ever since I was about 6 years old, I've had a vision of what I would look like in the next 5 years. There was an internal promise to myself that John at age 11 would finally maintain that radical 'fro of his ... and maybe less scrapes and bruises. Age 16 would be greeted with sideburns and a mustache (alas, it was 17). When it was time to start college, I shortened my sights to two years into the future. The well-educated (and taller) me would wear trendy spectacles, sport boat shoes at all times, and just be an all-around young, dapper gentleman.

For the most part, my predictions came true ... I think. Yet, when I look back at old photos, there are times where I miss my innocence. And my love of plaid. And wearing bow ties. What if I could don that tacky Yogi Bear sweater again — the one I wore so proudly on my first day of kindergarten?

It seems like Argentinian-based photographer Irina Werning channels my nostalgia in his latest project, "Back to the Future." On her website she says she has a penchant for "imagining how people would feel and look like if they were to reenact them today" ... them, meaning photos from 20, 30, and even 40 years ago.

What I love most about these photos is how Werning literally recreates every single photo — from the pose and the smiles, to the settings and quality of film. These snapshots invoke the same emotions nearly anyone experiences when flipping through your own family albums — goofiness, gasps, and good times.

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