March 21st Show

Libyan rebels wave their flag on top of a damaged tank belonging to Libyan government forces, at the western entrance of Benghazi.

hide captionLibyan rebels wave their flag on top of a damaged tank belonging to Libyan government forces, at the western entrance of Benghazi.

Patrick Baz/AFP

Libya News Special
In an effort to enforce the UN-sanctioned no-fly zone and cripple Moammar Gadhafi's military forces, two cruise missiles have destroyed Gadhafi's personal compound — though U.S. officials continue to say the Libyan leader is not a target. Coalition forces are reportedly making progress in taking out Gadhafi's military assets, according to White House officials. Host Neal Conan get updates from Libya and around the world for this NPR news special.

Japan News Special
As gray smoke poured from two reactor units at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant today, workers were forced to evacuate, putting efforts to restore the plant's cooling systems on hold. Now officials and residents also face concerns about radiation-tainted food and water. Host Neal Conan talks to NPR foreign correspondent Rob Gifford from Mizusawa in Northern Japan about the destruction in the area, and with NPR science desk reporter Nell Greenfieldboyce about the current state of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant.

Libya Update
As the U.S., British and French planes continue to to carry out air strikes in Libya in order to stop Moammar Gadhafi's forces from advancing, the debate over intervention continues. Many say that these actions, including a no-fly zone are needed, in order to protect the Libyans from being attacked, as well as to sustain U.S. alliances. Those opposed to the decision argue intervention is a terrible idea — it's costly, and this is not a problem for the U.S. to solve. Neal Conan talks with Congressman Ron Paul about the advantages and disadvantages of U.S. intervention in Libya.

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