April 11th Show

The U.S. Capitol building  illuminated Friday evening, as Congress worked inside to reach a budget  compromise and avert a government shutdown.

The U.S. Capitol building illuminated Friday evening, as Congress worked inside to reach a budget compromise and avert a government shutdown. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Budget Deal
As the dust settles from a last-minute deal brokered by the president and top lawmakers to avoid a government shutdown, questions loom about what exactly was included in the $38.5 billion in cuts. President Obama signed another temporary spending bill to keep the government running but details of the deal for the 2011 budget are still largely unknown to the public, and even some Congress members. Host Neal Conan speaks with NPR's senior Washington editor Ron Elving about what happened over the weekend, and what's to come.

Opinion Page
The Obama Administration recently reversed its decision to try alleged 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed in civilian courts. Instead, the the trial will be in a military tribunal at Guantanamo Bay, the system established by President George W. Bush to try terrorist suspects. The reversal infuriated people who have long questioned the constitutionality of indefinite detention. But Karen Greenberg, an advocate for civilian trials, says any trial is better than none. She directs the Center on Law and Security at New York University School of Law, and says the trial will shed light on the planning and timing of the attack - things largely unclear to the American public. On this week's opinion page, she explains her piece, Even At Guantanamo, A 9/11 Trial Can Serve Justice.

Our Haggadah
When Cokie and Steve Roberts got married nearly 45 years ago, they met a challenge familiar to many mixed-faith couples: practice no religion, pick one or the other, or do both. Over the years, they decided to go with the latter, choosing to respect each other's Catholic and Jewish faiths, and to celebrate those traditions as well. In a new book, the couple chronicles their own marriage and family life, and shares the guide they created to celebrating Passover and other religious holidays with family and friends of all faiths. Neal Conan talks with Cokie and Steve Roberts about their book, Our Haggadah: Uniting Traditions For Interfaith Families.

The Science Of Climate
During a Congressional hearing on climate science in March, physicist Richard Muller was expected to testify on the side of climate change skeptics. Muller has been working with a team of scientists at the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature Project to determine whether other groups analyzing temperature measurements may have distorted data. Instead of supporting claims that global warming is a myth, Muller announced that the Berkeley project found a global warming trend "very similar to that reported by prior groups" and that "some of the most worrisome biases are less of a problem that I previously thought." Host Neal Conan talks with Muller about his findings on climate change and the challenges scientists face in balancing politics and emotion with fact.

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