May 3rd Show

In our second hour, two authors of the book Shrink Rap explain the highs and lows in their field of psychiatry.

In our second hour, two authors of the book Shrink Rap explain the highs and lows in their field of psychiatry. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

'Arab Spring' Continues
While much of the world's attention focused on the killing of Osama bin Laden, the Arab Spring — and violent government responses — continued. A weekend airstrike killed the son of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and government troops recently stepped up attacks on rebel strongholds in that country's civil war. In Syria, the government hopes to put down protests with door-to-door searches and arrests. Host Neal Conan talks with Anthony Shadid of The New York Times and other reporters in the region about the latest outbreak of violence in the Arab Spring.

Bin Laden's Legacy
Fourteen years ago, Peter Bergen interviewed Osama bin Laden on a rocky plateau near the caves of Tora Bora in Afghanistan. Recently, he theorized that the world's most wanted terrorist was hiding not in a remote cave but in a comfortable house in Pakistan. On Sunday, his instinct proved correct. Bergen, now CNN's national security analyst, has written three books on bin Laden and the war on terror and remains one of the few journalists to ever meet him. Today, Bergen joins Neal Conan to discuss bin Laden's legacy, and what the charismatic leader's death may mean for al Qaida U.S. efforts to eradicate terrorism.

'Shrink Rap'
Psychiatry, as a profession, is often misunderstood. The stereotype includes a long couch, dim lighting and a man with a soothing voice asking, "And, how did that make you feel?" The reality is much more complicated. In a new book, Shrink Rap, three psychiatrists describe what they do every day, the challenges they face and some of the reasons people seek help. Host Neal Conan talks with two of the authors, Dr. Dinah Miller and Dr. Steve Daviss, about the new book and the joys, challenges and shortcomings of their field.

The Greatest Movie Ever Sold
In his new documentary, filmmaker Morgan Spurlock acknowledges that product placement happens all the time in Hollywood — and has become a critical part of paying for projects. And while audiences sometimes find it intrusive, and most producers try to disguise the ads, Spurlock's made it the center piece of his own film. He explores the business of co-promotion — where movies are infiltrated with images of brand-name products that pay for the exposure — by filling his documentary about product placement with relentless product placements. Neal Conan talks with Morgan Spurlock about his new film called, appropriately, POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.