June 14: What's On Today's Show

In today's second hour, we'll talk about the right — and wrong — things to say to someone who's very sick. i i

In today's second hour, we'll talk about the right — and wrong — things to say to someone who's very sick. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com
In today's second hour, we'll talk about the right — and wrong — things to say to someone who's very sick.

In today's second hour, we'll talk about the right — and wrong — things to say to someone who's very sick.

iStockphoto.com

Investigating And Prosecuting Rape
The trial of Dominique Strauss-Kahn, former head of the International Monetary Fund, will shine a bright light on the hard task of winning convictions in rape and sexual assault trials. There isn't always evidence, it's rare for there to be witnesses and victims have historically been ignored, belittled or worse. Neal Conan speaks with guests who train investigators and prosecutors on the best practices to find the truth and convict the guilty.

Arizona Fire
Since it started in late May, the Wallow Fire in northeastern Arizona has burned close to half a million acres and threatens the neighboring state New Mexico. Firefighters have contained 18 percent of the fire so far. Reporter Peter O'Dowd, tells host Neal Conan about the latest efforts to contain what could be the worst fire in Arizona history.

Travels In Pakistan
In light of the raid on Osama bin Laden and the freeing of CIA contractor Raymond Davis, relations between the U.S. and Pakistan are increasingly uncertain. Host Neal Conan talks with Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep and producer Asma Khalid who recently returned from a trip to Pakistan about the heightened sense of distrust they experienced on the ground. NPR's Pakistan Bureau Chief Julie McCarthy also will join the conversation by satellite phone.

What To Say To Someone Who's Sick
When bestselling author Bruce Feiler was diagnosed with bone cancer three years ago, he was thankful for the prayers, postcards and casseroles. But there were some things that friends and family did, with the best intentions, that just didn't help. In a recent piece in The New York Times, Feiler offers advice on what to do: avoid offering cliche phrases, baseless reassurance, or compliments that just aren't true. He also shares tips on things that can help: sharing some gossip, taking out the trash, and when all else fails, saying "I love you." Host Neal Conan talks with Feiler, contributor to The New York Times Sunday Styles section, about his piece, "'You Look Great' and Other Lies."

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