June 15: What's On Today's Show

Tourists watch the 'Old Faithful' geyser which erupts on average every 90 minutes in the Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming on June 1, 2011. In our second hour, guests give tips on how to be a traveler, not a tourist.

Tourists watch the 'Old Faithful' geyser which erupts on average every 90 minutes in the Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming on June 1, 2011. In our second hour, guests give tips on how to be a traveler, not a tourist. MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

The Political Junkie
Republican presidential hopefuls squared off in New Hampshire for the first debate of the 2012 primary to include the front runner. The seven candidates largely spared one another the jabs, instead, they punched at President Barack Obama. Political junkie Ken Rudin and host Neal Conan talk with Democratic strategist Donna Brazile, who managed Al Gore's presidential run, about prepping a candidate for debate season: When do you pull the punches? When do you go on the attack? What's the strategy for a front runner? And for a newcomer? The two will also recap the week in politics, from Sarah Palin's emails, to Newt Gingrich's campaign implosion and the ruling on new union laws in Wisconsin.

Hillary Clinton Message To Africa
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton traveled to Africa this week and pushed members of the African Union to break with Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and urge him to stop killing civilans. Her strong words met with a sharp response from South African president Jacob Zuma. He complained in a speech Tuesday that NATO had overstepped the U.N. resolution and is now seeking "regime change, political assassinations and foreign military occupation" in Libya. Host Neal Conan talks with NPR Diplomatic Correspondent Michele Kelemen about Secretary Clinton's tough words to the African Union and with NPR's West Africa Correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the reaction from African leaders.

Be A Traveler, Not A Tourist
Booking a package tour might be the most efficient way to plan a quick summer getaway. But an all-inclusive luxury package likely won't lead you to encounter the unexpected, satisfy a yearning for the road less-traveled, or stumble upon a more meaningful experience. Few know more about the art of travel than acclaimed travel writers Paul Theroux and Pico Iyer, who have a combined six decades of experience chronicling their adventures around the world. Theroux's latest book, The Tao of Travel, draws from his own journeys as well as the experiences of several centuries of travel writers. 100 Journeys For The Spirit, edited by Pico Iyer, details scores of destinations around the globe that have inspired and humbled generations of travelers. Neal Conan talks with Theroux and Iyer about what makes travel meaningful, and how to be a traveler, rather than a tourist.

Fake Blog Fallout
It was another gripping story from the Arab Spring: A young American Arab girl living in Damascus, a lesbian blogger with an online community of friends around the world, kidnapped by Syrian authorities. Except none of it was true. Amina Arraf was the fictional invention of a white American man living in Scotland. The episode lead Brian Spears to offer this advice to his fellow white writers: "Don't co-opt the voice of a minority in hopes that people will take your writing more seriously." Spears, of therumpus.net, joins host Neal Conan to talk about issues raised by the phony 'Gay Girl In Damascus', including white privilege, the role of journalists and creative license online.

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