June 23rd: What's On Today's Show

In the second hour, NPR blogger Adam Frank explains how the way we measure time has changed over the centuries.

hide captionIn the second hour, NPR blogger Adam Frank explains how the way we measure time has changed over the centuries.

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Whitey Bulger Capture
The FBI yesterday captured James "Whitey" Bulger, the infamous Boston mobster and former FBI informant accused of murdering 19 people. He was found in Santa Monica, California after 16 years on the run. Bulger was on the FBI's Top Ten Most Wanted list and was one inspiration for the movie, The Departed. Bulger started working as a secret FBI informant in the 1970s and the case raised troubling questions about the FBI's relationship with informants. Host Neal Conan details the story of Whitey Bulger, and talks about the difficult balance between informants and law enforcement.

Afghanistan Opinion Pages
President Obama last night announced a plan to withdraw 10,000 U.S. troops from Afghanistan by the end of the year and bring another 20,000 troops home by the end of 2012. The president aimed for a middle ground between the growing chorus of legislators and voters who argue for a rapid withdrawal and those, including the military, who insist that a large withdrawal puts recent gains at risk. Based on much of the reaction from the public and Congress, he did not satisfy either side. Host Neal Conan reads from a selection of editorials and op-eds and talks with callers about the president's plans for the future of U.S. forces in Afghanistan.

Measuring Time
Time seems to slow in the summer. School's out. Many people go on vacation, and leave the watch and Blackberry behind. How we measure time has changed dramatically over the centuries. We used to tell time by the sun and the stars, and our first clocks had no minute hand. Now, every second counts. Neal Conan talks with University of Rochester professor and NPR blogger Adam Frank about time — how our perceptions of it change with new technologies, how it became a social construct and how it plays out in our busy days.

The Price Of Sex
The Berlin Wall locked Eastern Europeans inside an open air prison, but when it fell in 1989 many countries were unprepared for what came with the opening of the gates. In many countries, liberation left a vacuum that filled with a corrosive mix of corruption, lawlessness and deep poverty. In the worst cases, an epidemic of human trafficking, rape and forced prostitution ensnared hundreds of thousands of women. Host Neal Conan wraps up our series on the American Film Institute's Silverdocs film festival with director Mimi Chakarova whose extraordinary new film, The Price of Sex, reveals the often hidden world of human trafficking.

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