Are Humans the Albino Crocodiles of the Future?

Werner Herzog poses the essential question in his new film: Are humans the albino crocodiles of the future? i i

Werner Herzog poses the essential question in his new film: Are humans the albino crocodiles of the future? mll on Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption mll on Flickr
Werner Herzog poses the essential question in his new film: Are humans the albino crocodiles of the future?

Werner Herzog poses the essential question in his new film: Are humans the albino crocodiles of the future?

mll on Flickr

No.

But it's the question film maker Werner Herzog asks in his new documentary Cave of Forgotten Dreams. (You can watch the trailer here.)

I've enjoyed a number of his documentaries; Grizzly Man for his quirky story telling, Little Dieter Needs to Fly for finding such a willing subject, Encounters at the End of the World for its dramatic footage.

His films tend to focus on people that try to conquer the impossible — humans overcoming immeasurable obstacles, land, challenges. Herzog's most recent documentary (which was shot in 3-D) explores a cave in the south of France that's home to what could be the oldest paintings on earth.

But he can't let it go there. Herzog, who narrates his own films, asks questions throughout the film about the artist's intents and dreams.

Now we're getting into Herzog territory.

It's fascinating enough and won't spoil all the wonderful commentary, but he makes a huge jump at the end.

From the depths of a cave and early stages of modern life ... to "mutant crocodiles." Here he is explaining the move on "The Colbert Report."

I'll let you decide if the jump is a logical one.

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