July 14: What's On Today's Show

In today's first hour, Don Tapscott argues that the traditional college and university risks becoming obsolete in an era where students are used to learning from technology and the Internet. He'll tell us why they need to adapt, or lose out to cheaper, more accessible online competitors. i i

In today's first hour, Don Tapscott argues that the traditional college and university risks becoming obsolete in an era where students are used to learning from technology and the Internet. He'll tell us why they need to adapt, or lose out to cheaper, more accessible online competitors. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com
In today's first hour, Don Tapscott argues that the traditional college and university risks becoming obsolete in an era where students are used to learning from technology and the Internet. He'll tell us why they need to adapt, or lose out to cheaper, more accessible online competitors.

In today's first hour, Don Tapscott argues that the traditional college and university risks becoming obsolete in an era where students are used to learning from technology and the Internet. He'll tell us why they need to adapt, or lose out to cheaper, more accessible online competitors.

iStockphoto.com

Rethinking The College Classroom
Don Tapscott has been studying the effects of the digital revolution for decades Now, he's shifted his focus to institutions. And in his opinion, one institution in particular is ripe for change. Tapscott says the model of the teacher lecturing the students is no longer reasonable for a generation that has grown up making, changing, and learning from digital communities. Host Neal Conan talks with Don Tapscott about how universities must adjust to the new world or face irrelevancy.

Women's World Cup Soccer
The United States women's soccer team just keeps winning and advances to the World Cup finals on Sunday, the first time since 1999. This year's squad has overcome powerhouses like Brazil and France while in the shadow of the 1999 team. And until this week, few people were paying attention. Host Neal Conan talks with NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman about the team's remarkable run, the finals match between the U.S. and Japan, who's watching the tournament and how it compares to previous women's World Cups.

Teen Dating Violence
Teenagers are often not well equipped to deal with violence in their relationships, or even identify it. Too often they become overwhelmed by conflicting emotions and confuse controlling behavior with signs of affection. And teens who are in violent relationships are often reluctant to tell their parents, teachers, or friends. Neal Conan talks with Keisha Ormond of the Community Advocacy Program, and Lawrence Harmon, a Boston Globe columnist and father of three daughters, about the prevalence of teen dating violence and how parents can talk to teens about the problem.

Drugs Prevent HIV
Researchers have found that antiretroviral drugs can sharply reduce the risk of acquiring HIV for heterosexual men and women, according to two studies released yesterday. The studies conducted in Kenya and Uganda examined nearly 5,000 heterosexual couples and found that those who took a daily dose of the antiretroviral pills had a 63 to 73 percent less risk of contracting HIV. Previous studies showed the drugs reduced the spread of the virus in gay men. One doctor called this latest news, "a game changer." Host Neal Conan talks with Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, about the expanding options for HIV prevention, the challenging questions about who gets access to the drugs, and what these studies could mean for the HIV epidemic.

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