#TheVerdictIsIn - What Do You Have To Say?

In the Casey Anthony trial, social media made a verdict of its own. i i

In the Casey Anthony trial, social media made a verdict of its own. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto
In the Casey Anthony trial, social media made a verdict of its own.

In the Casey Anthony trial, social media made a verdict of its own.

iStockphoto

Keyboards, phone pads and touch screens around the country were in action last week. Why? The Casey Anthony trial was over and social media changed the way we talked about it... or tweeted about it.

Last week, when the verdict was announced, I glanced at my Twitter feed to find an explosion of reactions to the case and let's just say, not everyone agreed with the final outcome. Everyone on my timeline had an opinion and they were making it known to the world. But it didn't stop with Twitter, it also spread to Facebook. In a recent USA Today article, it was reported that more than 320,000 people on Facebook "liked" a page saying the verdict was wrong. And as if that wasn't enough, celebrities like Kim Kardashian tweeted their fury about the verdict and HLN host Nancy Grace, who helped make the case a television sensation, responded to the decision by saying, "The devil is dancing."

Too much? Too harsh? Well, now it's too late because it's been tweeted and/or quoted and now it's become a part of this case for digital history.

And just think, we thought the 1995 O.J. Simpson trial would live on as one of the most controversial cases of our time. Well, it's still one of America's high profile trials but it was a case that stayed in one dimension – cable news.

Casey Anthony, on the other hand, took over our televisions, smart phones, computer screens and many of our lives for a short period of time and because of social media her case will live online for years to come.

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