July 19th: What's On Today's Show

Should parents lose custody of a child who is extremely obese? In our second hour, guests talk about a recent proposal to do just that, and how parents can help overweight children.

hide captionShould parents lose custody of a child who is extremely obese? In our second hour, guests talk about a recent proposal to do just that, and how parents can help overweight children.

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Childhood Obesity
Obesity rates have nearly tripled since 1980 among teens and children in the United States. A recent provocative article in The Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that the best place for super obese children may be foster care, but only in extreme cases. There's a wealth of conflicting information and many parents just don't know what to do to help their severely overweight children. Host Neal Conan talks with experts about what really works to help overweight and obese children.

Rupert Murdoch
Members of Britain's Parliament today peppered Rupert Murdoch and his son James with questions about the phone hacking scandal that brought down their tabloid The News of the World. The elder Murdoch said he was "shocked, appalled and ashamed" to learn that the phone of a murdered school girl was hacked. He told parliament that because the paper makes up such a small part of his company, he lost track of the tabloid and its actions. Host Neal Conan replays excerpts of the testimony to parliament on a day the mogul called "the most humble day of my life."

After The Arab Spring
The burst of uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa became known as the Arab Spring. Now many countries struggle with what comes next. While violent government crackdowns continue in Syria and Libya, Tunisia, and Egypt struggle to rebuild a functioning government. The massive street protests that reverberated across the region swept dictators from power, changed political dynamics and gave many people a new voice in the future of their country. But expectations, and realities, vary widely from country to country. Host Neal Conan talks with Dalia Mogahed of the Gallup Center for Muslim Studies, and Marwan Masher of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, about what's changed in the region, what hasn't, and what comes next after the Arab Spring.

Pirates of Somalia
Jay Bahadur wanted to know first-hand how modern pirates live and operate. So he traveled to Somalia. His first interview in Puntland, Somalia ended abruptly when a pirate leader named Boyah skipped off to get his fix of khat. The leafy stimulant is the drug of choice for pirates in Somalia. Bahadur spent six weeks meeting with pirates and government officials. He tells their stories, debunks many myths commonly held in the west and examines the rise of piracy off the Somali coast in his new book, The Pirates of Somalia: Inside their Hidden World. Bahadur joins host Neal Conan to discuss his time in Somalia and his first book.

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