A Comforting iTouch

A serviceman, holds an iPad equipped with an app for to help soldiers suffering from PTSD. i i

A serviceman, holds an iPad equipped with an app for to help soldiers suffering from PTSD. Ted S. Warren/Associated Press hide caption

itoggle caption Ted S. Warren/Associated Press
A serviceman, holds an iPad equipped with an app for to help soldiers suffering from PTSD.

A serviceman, holds an iPad equipped with an app for to help soldiers suffering from PTSD.

Ted S. Warren/Associated Press

Suffering from PTSD? To borrow a phrase you've likely never heard, there's an app for that, too.

Sorry for once again being blown away by technology. I am often skeptical of new trinkets like this, but this one's pretty interesting.

The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense launched the "PTSD Coach" app back in April, and a month later, it had thousands of downloads. Now, there are several of these apps, including "T2 Mood Tracker,", Breathe2Relax. The apps offer tips for managing the symptoms and information about the condition, nothing that would replace counseling or other forms of treatment.

Staff Sgt. Meg Krause, a reservist and medic, told the AP, "I'm not going to lie — when this came out, we sort of wanted to slam it." She's had counseling for PTSD and said it surprised her friends and has been a "phenomenal tool."

And tablets and smartphones are making their way into combat as well. The Army is testing iPhones and Androids to see if they can relay real-time images from drones.

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