September 14th: What's On Today's Show

Michael Moore joins us in today's second hour, to talk about his memoir, "Here Comes Trouble."

hide captionMichael Moore joins us in today's second hour, to talk about his memoir, "Here Comes Trouble."

Hachette Books

The Political Junkie
Democrats were stunned by special elections in New York and Nevada, President Obama's jobs bill gets an introduction in the Senate, and disapproving buzz elsewhere, and the Republican field of candidates shifts and turns after Monday's Tea Party debate. The Political Junkie Ken Rudin talks about the week in politics, and is joined by special guest Al Gore.

Al Gore's Reality Show
Former Vice President Al Gore thrust the issue of climate change into public view with his 2006 documentary, An Inconvenient Truth. In the following years, public opinion shifted. Polls showed fewer Americans worried about the effects of climate change and fewer believed that its effects are happening. As the environment becomes more and more of a political issue in the lead-up to the 2012 elections, Gore returns with a new project designed to "broadcast the reality of the climate crisis." Host Neal Conan talks with former Vice President Al Gore about climate change and the war for public opinion, the Obama administration's environmental record, the 2012 presidential race, and his upcoming event, "24 Hours of Reality."

'Here Comes Trouble'
You know Michael Moore for his provocative documentaries: Bowling for Columbine and Farenheit 9/11 among other films. In his new book, Here Comes Trouble, Moore reveals that in the days before his first film, Roger & Me, he didn't like documentaries. "Documentaries felt like medicine, like castor oil — something I was supposed to watch because they were good for me." In his new memoir, Moore explains "how I got this way" and shares stories of his journey from a teen with a real interest in being a Catholic priest, to a young supporter of Richard Nixon to controversial Award-winning filmmaker and bestselling author. Moore joins host Neal Conan to share stories from his life.

Baseball Milestones
Two milestones last night in Major League Baseball: In Boston, Tim Wakefield notched his 200th victory to revive the reeling Red Sox. Then in Seattle, Mariano Rivera of the New York Yankees recorded the 600th save of his career. Two very different players, who relied almost entirely, on one pitch, Wakefield on the elusive knuckleball, Rivera on his celebrated cutter. Batters almost always knew what was coming and, for the most part, couldn't hit it. NPR's Mike Pesca joins host Neal Conan to talk about the incredible success of these one-pitch wonders.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: