September 15th: What's On Today's Show

President John F. Kennedy and wife  Jacqueline Onassis Kennedy disembark from Air Force One in Paris on May  31st, 1961. Audio tapes of Jacqueline Kennedy's candid accounts of  her experiences as first lady, recorded in 1964, have just been released to the  public. i i

hide captionPresident John F. Kennedy and wife Jacqueline Onassis Kennedy disembark from Air Force One in Paris on May 31st, 1961. Audio tapes of Jacqueline Kennedy's candid accounts of her experiences as first lady, recorded in 1964, have just been released to the public.

AFP/Getty Images
President John F. Kennedy and wife  Jacqueline Onassis Kennedy disembark from Air Force One in Paris on May  31st, 1961. Audio tapes of Jacqueline Kennedy's candid accounts of  her experiences as first lady, recorded in 1964, have just been released to the  public.

President John F. Kennedy and wife Jacqueline Onassis Kennedy disembark from Air Force One in Paris on May 31st, 1961. Audio tapes of Jacqueline Kennedy's candid accounts of her experiences as first lady, recorded in 1964, have just been released to the public.

AFP/Getty Images

How The Greek Debt Crisis Could Migrate To The U.S.
Many European banks struggle under a mountain of debt and Greece stands at the tipping point of a potential default. If Greece defaults, the repercussions will likely ripple through the euro-zone and across the Atlantic to the United States. After a series of meetings, foreign leaders in the European Union came to a compromise to tighten budget rules and ease concerns of an immediate default. But at best, it's a short-term and temporary solution. Host Neal Conan talks with guests about Greece's looming default, the debt crisis in Europe and the domino effect it could have from Athens to Paris to Wall Street.

The State Of The Gulf
A government report released this week found that BP bears the ultimate responsibility for the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010, while also citing other companies involved. More than a year after the largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history, offshore drilling has returned to near-normal levels after a ban was lifted and many businesses and residents along the Gulf coast report that life has largely returned to normal. Still, tar balls washed up after recent storms and the long-term effects on the ecosystem are still being studied. Host Neal Conan talks with Ed Overton, professor emeritus in the department of environmental sciences at Louisiana State University, about the environmental state of the Gulf.

Re-writing Your Life Story
As many people near the end of their lives, doctors have found that what they fear most is dying without leaving something concrete behind. One solution: Dignity therapy. It's a clinical procedure in which a medical professional helps patients to document their life stories — the important moments, the lessons, and values — as they want it told. Those narratives are then left for their families to read once they're gone. Recent studies show that nearly 70 per cent of patients who participate in dignity therapy report an increased sense of meaning and purpose after the treatment. Host Neal Conan speaks with NPR science reporter Alix Spiegel and Dr. Harvey Chochinov about the science behind dignity therapy and why so many patients choose this treatment.

Jackie Kennedy Tapes
In March 1964, just months after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, his wife Jacqueline sat down with historian Arthur Schleshinger to record candid accounts of her experiences as first lady. Fifty years after JFK's inauguration, the tapes are being released, with accompanying transcripts, as a new book and CD. Jackie Kennedy reveals JFK's opinions on various subjects, as well as her own, from life in the White House to thoughts on prominent figures. Neal Conan talks with historian Sally Bedell Smith about what we can learn about the former first lady from the tapes.

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