October 5th: What's On Today's Show

The Bippolo Seed And Other Lost Stories by Dr. Seuss i i

The Bippolo Seed And Other Lost Stories by Dr. Seuss

Random House Books for Young Readers hide caption

itoggle caption Random House Books for Young Readers
The Bippolo Seed And Other Lost Stories by Dr. Seuss

The Bippolo Seed And Other Lost Stories by Dr. Seuss

Random House Books for Young Readers

The Political Junkie
Political Junkie Ken Rudin is with us on the road in Ohio this week, and it's all about the primaries — with South Carolina and Florida jockeying for position, it's moved some candidates' decisions up — including New Jersey Governor Chris Christie. He announced yesterday that now is not his time. Host Neal Conan talks with the Political Junkie about all the week's political news. We'll also get a snapshot of Ohio's political scene, plus, a new trivia question.

'The Bippolo Seed'
The creative vision of author and illustrator Dr. Seuss brought fantastic and lively characters into the imagination of generations of kids. Two decades after his death, a new book features a collection of long lost stories, including The Bippolo Seed and Gustav the Goldfish. Host Neal Conan speaks with Charles Cohen, who rediscovered the lost stories and compiled them for the book, The Bippolo Seed and Other Stories about how he found them, about Dr. Seuss' life, and what Dr. Seuss means today.

'MetaMaus'
Cartoonist Art Spiegelman's epic tale of the Holocaust, the graphic novel Maus was published twenty-five years ago — and changed everything about his life. He received a special Pulitzer Prize and became a contributor and cover artist for the New Yorker. But Maus continued to haunt him, until he decided to release a new book about the making of Maus — called, MetaMaus, complete with interviews, answers to many persistent questions and examples of his early drawings. Host Neal Conan talks with Art Spiegelman about MetaMaus and the making of, the making of Maus.

Columnist Connie Shultz Resigns
Pulitzer Prize winning columnist Connie Shultz resigned from the Cleveland Plain Dealer two weeks ago, after writing for the newspaper for 18 years. She is married to U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) — and she said that she's concerned about the effect her writing could have on her husband's campaign, and the way her husband's campaign could potentially raise issues of a conflict of interest at the newspaper. Schultz joins host Neal Conan to talk about her decision to resign, her long career, and the future of opinion journalism.

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