November 9th: What's On Today's Show

Republican presidential candidate and former Godfather's Pizza CEO Herman Cain speaks at a press conference November 8, 2011 in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Republican presidential candidate and former Godfather's Pizza CEO Herman Cain speaks at a press conference November 8, 2011 in Scottsdale, Arizona. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Eric Thayer/Getty Images

The Political Junkie
Tuesday was election day in many states. In Ohio, voters overturned a controversial bill limiting union rights. With one race still too close to call in Virginia, Republicans in that state can still seize the senate. Mississippians elected a new governor and voted down an amendment on "personhood." Analysts are poring over these results and others, trying to read the tea leaves: Are Tuesday's results a harbinger for 2012? Host Neal Conan and political junkie Ken Rudin will recap the votes and the week in politics. The two will also speak with political insiders Anna Greenberg and Alex Vogel about the electorate and hot races — less than one year from the election day 2012.

Sex Abuse: Why We Speak Up, Or Not
Allegations of sexual abuse in recent years have shaken institutions from the Catholic Church to public schools to Penn State's football program. In many cases, victims and their families say they reported the abuse to the people in charge and for any number of reasons those people didn't do enough to stop it. Host Neal Conan talks with guests about why people with knowledge of abuse decide to speak up, or not, and how to change the culture of silence that often exists around sexual abuse in many cases. He'll talk with Mindy Mitnick, a licensed psychologist who has worked with witnesses of abuse, with Amy Russell, an attorney and counselor. Rocco Palmo, who runs the Whispers in the Loggia blog, also joins the conversation to talk about the Catholic Church and how it's dealt with sex abuse allegations and witnesses.

'Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare 3'
While DVD sales plummet in the U.S. and book publishers fear for their futures, pre-orders for Modern Warfare 3, the latest installment in the Call of Duty video game franchise, totaled some 9 million copies. That's three times more than its main competitor, another first-person shooter called Battlefield 3, also released this week. Critics complain of flaws in the narrative and game design, but most agree the Call of Duty series raised the bar on what gamers expect from their video games. And overall video game sales in the U.S. now rival the ticket sales from Hollywood movies. Neal Conan and a guest talks about why Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 is getting so much attention and about the changing business of video games.

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