January 26th: What's On Today's Show

In the second hour, guests discuss the blessings and challenges of multigenerational households.

In the second hour, guests discuss the blessings and challenges of multigenerational households. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

Crises In Nigeria
Police in Nigeria arrested nearly 200 people after last week's coordinated bomb attacks in Kano, Nigeria's second-largest city. The radical Islamist group Boko Haram took responsibility for the series of blasts near police stations and government buildings that killed between 150 and 200 people. The increased violence threatens to ignite a wider Muslim-Christian conflict in Africa's most populous country. The nation also continues to face persistent problems with the economy, corruption and other issues. Host Jennifer Ludden talks to NPR correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, who's in Kano, and to former U.S. Ambassador to Nigeria John Campbell as well as Nigerian human rights activist Shehu Sani about the ongoing crises in Nigeria.

'A Practical Wedding'
December's a big month for engagements, which means there are lots of newly-betrothed couples emerging from the celebratory haze this month, and dipping a toe into wedding planning waters. There are scores of important decisions to make — from whom to invite to how to pay for it — and a quick scan of the bookstore magazine rack and 'wedding' results on Google seems to make one thing clear: Big or small, your wedding better be a showstopper. Even the hardiest of partners can feel a little lost. Meg Keene joins guest host Jennifer Ludden to help. She's the author of the new book, A Practical Wedding, which sprang from her website of the same name. She's passionate about an "insanity-free wedding experience" that focuses on the meaning of marriage, at least as much as flowers and cake.

Multigenerational Households
As baby boomers age and more young people struggle to break into the workplace, more families are choosing to pool resources by moving in together. The economic downturn accelerated this already growing national trend toward multiple generations, all living under the same roof. And while there are many challenges, the benefits, many families say, go well beyond the pocketbook. Guest host Jennifer Ludden speaks with Katherine Newman about what's behind the growing number of multigenerational households in America. Greg McGuff of national homebuilder Lennar Homes also joins the conversation to discuss the company's homes designed specifically for multigenerational families.

'All I Did Was Shoot My Man'
In his latest crime novel, All I Did Was Shoot My Man, best-selling author Walter Mosley tells the story of Zella Grisham, a woman trying to get her life back on track after serving an eight-year prison term for grand larceny. Leonid McGill, a private investigator, knows Zella's innocent. He played a central role in her arrest and tries to help her get her life back on track. The novel takes us on a journey with Leonid to atone for his own corrupt past as he navigates his complicated personal life and an even more complex city full of vibrant, unforgettable characters. Guest host Jennifer Ludden talks with Mosley about his latest novel, his career as a crime fiction writer, and what his novels say about society.

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