February 22nd: What's On Today's Show

In our second hour, guests and listeners talk about correcting inaccuracies on Wikipedia.

In our second hour, guests and listeners talk about correcting inaccuracies on Wikipedia. Screen grab from Wikipedia hide caption

itoggle caption Screen grab from Wikipedia

The Political Junkie
Arizona and Michigan hold their primaries on Tuesday. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is leading in Arizona, although former Sen. Rick Santorum is nipping at his heels. And Michigan is effectively tied between the two. Some analysts are calling the Michigan race a do-or-die state for Romney, who grew up in the suburbs of Detroit, and where is father was a popular governor. Political Junkie Ken Rudin and host Neal Conan speak with NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea about the Michigan primary. Ken and Neal also recap the week in politics from progress in gay marriage in Maryland and a veto on it in New Jersey, to the latest fundraising numbers.

The Backlash Against Traffic Cameras
Traffic cameras that take pictures of cars that run red lights or are speeding are used in 661 cities around the county. City and state governments believe they make driving safer, encouraging drivers to respond promptly to changing lights and slow down. The cameras have stirred up controversy among motorists who believe the traffic cameras are nothing more than revenue generators and, in some cases, actually make driving more dangerous. Many motorists have taken their grievances to the voting booths, and ballot initiatives in cities across the country have rejected the installation of traffic cameras. Host Neal Conan speaks with NPR's Corey Dade about the ongoing debate surrounding traffic cameras and the backlash some cities are experiencing as a result of using them.

Remembering Marie Colvin

Host Neal Conan remembers journalist Marie Colvin, who was killed in Syria Wednesday, along with French photographer Remi Ochlik. Colvin joined Talk of the Nation several times, reporting from Gaza and Libya.

Weighing The Truth On Wikipedia
Wikipedia is the go-to source for quick information on almost every topic imaginable. It strives to reflect neutral truths that can be verified by reliable sources. But what does Wikipedia define as a reliable source? Haymarket riot scholar and Bowling Green State University professor Timothy Messer-Kruse updated the Haymarket Wikipedia page citing new research. However, his edit was quickly removed by a fellow user. Host Neal Conan talks with Timothy Messer-Kruse, Andrew Lih, author of The Wikipedia Revolution: How a Bunch of Nobodies Created the World's Greatest Encyclopedia, and Wikimedia Foundation community organizer Steven Walling about Wikipedia.

'Undefeated' Hopes For One More Victory
In its 110-year history, the Manassas High School football team in Memphis had been a losing team. Then, in 2009, volunteer coach Bill Courtney led his team of inner-city and underprivileged young men to the playoffs. Undefeated chronicles Courtney's last season with the Manassas Tigers, and the dramatic challenges and triumphs in the players' lives. Host Neal Conan talks to the Dan Lindsay and T.J. Martin, the directors and editors of Undefeated, nominated for an Oscar for best documentary feature.

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