February 28th:What's On Today's Show

Americans are marrying outside of their race or ethnicity at record levels.  In our second hour, callers in interracial marriages talk about their families' reaction.

Americans are marrying outside of their race or ethnicity at record levels. In our second hour, callers in interracial marriages talk about their families' reaction. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Interracial Marriages Hit Record High
Americans are marrying outside of their race or ethnicity at record levels, a new Pew study finds. About 15% of new marriages in 2010 were considered interracial. That's double the level from just 30 years ago. Not only are the numbers of people marrying out increasing, so is support for it. But that's not to say there isn't family tension when someone chooses a mate from a different race or ethnicity. Guest host John Donvan speaks with Paul Taylor, executive vice president of the Pew Research Center, about the new numbers. He'll also speak with callers in interracial marriages about how families react.

What Modern Day Slavery Looks Like
Last week, the West Virginia House of Representatives passed a bill to strengthen penalties for human trafficking. West Virginia isn't the only state working to fight human trafficking — Florida, Mississippi and Georgia are among the other states increasing efforts to fight human trafficking. But what exactly does modern day slavery look like in the United States? Guest host John Donvan talks with guests including Bradley Myles of the Polaris Project.

You're Not That Busy
Author Laura Vanderkam says we all have the same 168 hours per week, yet we rarely think about how we are spending those hours. She used to tell people she was "too busy to breathe." But once Vanderkam started keeping track of how many minutes she devoted to certain activities, she was working fewer hours, sleeping more, and making the most of her time. Guest host John Donvan talks with Vanderkam about her article, "Are You As Busy As You Think?"

Charlie Trotter Trades The Kitchen For The Classroom
Chef Charlie Trotter helped pioneer American fine dining when French cuisine reigned on the food scene. His namesake restaurant in Chicago is considered one of the best in the world. After 25 years in business, Trotter will close shop in August to pursue a Master's in philosophy and political theory. Host John Donvan talks to Trotter about cooking up a new recipe for his life after the kitchen.

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