Plants and Climate Change

Amazon: A Reluctant Goodbye

Well, it's time to move on from our week in the Amazon. At least to the exclusion of the rest of the world. No doubt Rosario Costa Cabral and the planet's other inspirational farmers, gardeners and environmentalists will continue to be our guests on Talking Plants.

A few parting shots, if you will; not a whole lot to say, just some photos I have yet to share.

Manuel on the Mazagao

Early (and I mean early) one hot, steamy morning, Rosario's stepson Manuel agreed to act as tour guide on the Mazagao River, a tributary of the Amazon, and the family's "street" address. photo credit: Ketzel Levine, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption photo credit: Ketzel Levine, NPR
Amazon flowers

Pea-family purple, lobster claw helioconia red, and the canteloupe-colored blossoms of a river flower I'd like you to identify! photo credit: Ketzel Levine, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption photo credit: Ketzel Levine, NPR
water lettuce

The lime green of what we call water lettuce is a crunchy, cool color with pretty extraordinary foliage texture, and one of the only Amazon plants I grow outside (albeit just in summer). photo credit: Ketzel Levine hide caption

itoggle caption photo credit: Ketzel Levine
Mazagao

A reluctant goodbye to a magical place. Obrigado, Brazil!!! photo credit: Ketzel Levine hide caption

itoggle caption photo credit: Ketzel Levine

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

What a beautiful photo of your "breakfast bouquet". The cantalope color looks like a hibiscus or even and orchid of some sort?????
Thanks for the great trip. Sondra

Sent by Sondra | 6:37 PM | 2-9-2008

Not to be too picky, but it is "Obrigada" unless Ketzel is really a man.

Sent by Kathi | 10:47 AM | 2-10-2008

You are quite right, and you're not being picky, you're saving me from further embarrassment. Thanks!

Sent by Ketzel Levine | 6:35 PM | 2-10-2008

Wow. Thanks for that series of posts. I grew up in Belem and it was SO nice to see home again! Now I'm homesick. deb :)

Sent by deb :) | 9:09 PM | 2-10-2008

Are the cantalope color flowers plumeria? I've actually never seen one close up - but someone gave me a stem of a plumeria tree to root several months ago, and since it has taken hold - I'm anxiously awaiting its first bloom (may be a few years off?).

Sent by Susan | 10:01 PM | 2-10-2008

The orange plant looks like mandevilla.

Sent by Brieannon Akins | 7:05 PM | 2-13-2008

Ketzel, Ketzel, that red color you attribute to a bird of paradise sure looks more like a lobster claw helioconia to me. Could it be?

Sent by Alice | 3:13 PM | 2-21-2008

yes, yes, will change promptly, thanks for keeping me honest. So tell me, what's the melon-colored flower?

Sent by Ketzel Levine | 3:41 PM | 2-21-2008

It is hard to tell because the outlines of the petals sort of blend together, but the buds in the background look something like allamanda, although the leaves are not glossy enough and they usually don't have a red throat. The flower itself looks more like a hibiscus, but the leaves aren't quite right for that either. Thanks for the great armchair trip.

Sent by Alice | 1:03 AM | 2-22-2008