Behind the Curtain at TMM

From One High-Powered Week to the Next ...

Thank you again to all of you who took the time to get in touch with us this week. We're still receiving a lot of comments about my Can I Just Tell You? commentary on the Rev. Jeremiah Wright and Sen. Barack Obama controversy. It's been creeping up NPR's most e-mailed stories list. Thanks for sharing it.

(Of course, now I am thinking of all the other examples I could have cited of fake media self righteousness, like ... No. Never mind. I won't go there. Let me get my pressure back down.)

Here's what we're debating for next week's conversations:

There's a new short film by a Dutch parliamentarian making its rounds on Internet. It recounts the atrocities committed by Islamic extremists and makes the case that Islamic fundamentalists are waging a war on western culture and freedom.

Some say it's a provocative stand for free speech, others a gratuitous and irresponsible assault on a worldwide religious community.

Remember the cartoons published in a Danish newspaper that depicted the prophet Muhammad in a negative light, touching off worldwide protests in 2006? Will this have the same effect? So far, no. But this comes in the face of existing threats by Al Qaeda leaders against western targets.

We'll keep watching the story.

And, the big elections in Zimbabwe are Saturday. We hope we'll be able to offer some results, along with analysis, by Monday.

We're also working on stories for you about Women's History Month. Although March is coming to a close, our interest in women's history is not. We still have a few more stories to tell.

And ...

The 40th anniversary of the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., is next week.

I have an ambivalent relationship with anniversaries. On a practical level, they really are unavoidable because they are also news pegs. On a human level, they are unavoidable, too, it seems.

I am not a psychiatrist, but it seems to me that anniversaries mark us even when we are not trying to be conscious of them. ... I can honestly tell you that the first week of May is always a difficult time in my family. We lost a beloved family member during that time under tragic circumstances. It's interesting that we all become "blue" around that week. We "remember" unconsciously, even if we don't decide to remember.

So, perhaps, it is better to decide to remember, if that makes sense. I guess there is a reason why many of the world's religions commemorate the deaths of their key figures, as well as their lives. ... And why many offer rituals to acknowledge deaths of loved ones, however long past.

On the other hand, there is the "let sleeping dogs lie" school, which asks, if we continue to pick at the source of the pain will it ever go away?

Have a great weekend...

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

A brief comment on your interview last Friday with Celinda Lake---you asked her if Obama voters are really likely to vote for McCain if Clinton gets the nomination, and if Clinton voters would vote for McCain over Obama in the general.

Like Ms Lake, I don't think this is terribly likely. However, I do worry that many on both sides (especially 20-somethings and others who've never bothered to vote before) will simply stay home in November and not vote at all. It'd be nice to hear strategists tell how they plan to deal with *that* problem, especially since they've obviously been so good at it in the past...

Sent by Jonathon | 1:52 PM | 4-3-2008

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