Faith

When Things Fall Apart

There are some mornings when things couldn't possibly run any smoother — guests are in place, scripts are in order and then ... all systems go.

Not.

Today, that wasn't quite the case. During our first (and what we usually hope is our only) broadcast feed, we experienced difficulty with today's Faith Matters segment, which focused on the Southern Baptist Convention and a debate over reconciling the mega-denomination's racially tense past with the election of Barack Obama as this country's first Black president. Our two guests — both Baptist ministers — were kind enough to join us from affiliate studios in different parts of the south.

First, the Rev. Hershael York's studio line dropped from the conversation. Silence.

But no need to fear, right? The Rev. Dwight McKissick, our other guest, was still on the line.

... Until his line dropped, too. Both guests were now gone, leaving Michel as the lone voice on-air in TMM radio wilderness.

Now this is where it gets tricky in a live production format. Michel could've either:

a) panicked and lost her cool, or

b) spent the next 5 minutes vamping - desperate to fill precious airtime, as engineers scrambled to restore the connection, by giving listeners regional reports of the weekend weather forecast, or

c) maintained her title as the queen of what we like to call "grace under fire" — with a calm, levelheaded ease about the situation.

Thankfully, our host has always been a perfect "C" student (in this regard), which is what every executive producer dreams of!

Thankfully, Revs. York and McKissick were able to later re-join us for a seamless, thoughtful conversation. You can listen to it here.

... See, I bet you had no idea what really went down. And if you did, thanks for tagging along for the ride!

Enjoy your weekend.

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