Race

Today's Homework (Yes, For You)

It is so wrong to put on a program and then give you, our listeners, homework afterward. But I'm going to. Because several of the pieces we aired today came out of magazine pieces or columns or blog posts and we think they are so interesting we just know that you will want to check them out for yourselves (if you have a minute, of course, no pressure).

For today's program, we called upon Constance Ikokwu, an editor at THIS DAY newspaper in Nigeria. She's joined us before to give us perspective on how the Nigerian press is covering the story of Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, the Nigerian student who allegedly tried to bomb that Northwest Airlines flight on Christmas. But if you want MORE, we want to steer you to Saharareporters.com. That site publishes pieces from Nigerian reporters who are writing from all over the world. There's a fascinating debate there about Abdulmutallab. Here are some of the really interesting questions raised on that site:

What about the fact that he was sent away to boarding schools and raised away from family? That's a custom of the privileged in Nigeria, but is it a good one? And what about the fact that he was one of 15 kids by one of his father's two wives? Was he vulnerable to indoctrination in part because he was lonely for his family and didn't have enough supervision?

Read for yourself.

Also on Thursday's program, we talked with syndicated columnist Ruben Navarrette (a regular guest in our Barbershop roundtable) and with Kevin Johnson, dean of the law school at UC Davis and Board member at MALDEF, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund, about which term is more accurate: "illegal immigrant" or "undocumented immigrant" (or perhaps unauthorized immigrant). RUCKUS!! If you want to read some pieces that set up the argument, read this piece by Ruben Navarrette and this 2007 piece by Lawrence Downes.

And if you want to read Ethan Nichtern's blog about Buddhism, here it is.

And here is an earlier piece by Jeffrey Rosen wrote about the whole question of airport screening and privacy.

Hey! You're all set for your term paper! You can thank me later.

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