Gender Trenders: Changing Courses In College

Dean Spade, of the Seattle University School of Law. i i

hide captionDean Spade, of the Seattle University School of Law.

Courtesy of Dean Spade
Dean Spade, of the Seattle University School of Law.

Dean Spade, of the Seattle University School of Law.

Courtesy of Dean Spade

On college campuses in America, switching majors has been standard practice for a long time. Switching genders, not so much. But that's, um, changing.

At Salem College in North Carolina, for example, a female student planning to become a male student hoped to continue living on campus after the operation. In a letter to alums, Charles A. Blixt, chairman of the Salem College Board of Trustees, said that the board will decide if the women's school needs new policies regarding transgender issues. He emphasized that the college will not consider becoming coeducational.

Though some women's colleges have openly supported transgender students who have male or masculine identities, says transgender professor and trans advocate Dean Spade of the Seattle University School of Law, "many of these same schools still have policies that prevent the enrollment of trans women students. Alumni, faculty, students and trans advocates are working with these schools to ensure that they establish clear policies for making sure that they admit trans students and provide them with the school's health care, housing, and education programs."

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