Elevator Pitch: Contrarian Entrepreneurs

A lemonade stand. i i
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A lemonade stand.
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Worthless, Impossible, and Stupid: How Contrarian Entrepreneurs Create and Capture Extraordinary Value is a just-published book about the perils and rewards of being a self-starter.

Written by Daniel Isenberg, who teaches at Babson Global, and published by Harvard Business Review, the work has received some serious notices and blurbs.

USA Today: "The fascinating book is a colorful collection of stories based on case studies that Isenberg compiled during the 11 years he taught entrepreneurship at Harvard University."

The Wall Street Journal: "Mr. Isenberg excels at breaking down the many elements that lead to entrepreneurial success."

The Economist: Isenberg "presents a new definition of entrepreneurship. In essence, entrepreneurs are contrarian value creators. They see economic value where others see heaps of nothing. And they see business opportunities where others see only dead ends."

Calestous Juma, Harvard Kennedy School: "Calling all contrarians: If you've taken great risks, confronted skeptics and setbacks, and unleashed extraordinary value, you'll recognize yourself in this important new book."

So, Daniel Isenberg, why should we care about the entrepreneurs among us? You've got about 30 seconds. Go.

"Entrepreneurship has been with us for millennia, for as long as human society has existed, from before the innovative and wealth creating global Phoenicians to today's value creators and game changers. Like art, science, literature and theater, entrepreneurship is part of the human experience — that doesn't mean that anyone can be or everyone should be an entrepreneur; it will always be statistically rare, just like the great artist. But it is an integral part of what we are as human beings."

The Protojournalist is an experiment in reporting. Abstract. Concrete. @NPRtpj

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