Blog On Blog: A Weekend Of Festivals, Justin Bieber Crowned King Of Internet

Justin Bieber i

Fans who can't see Justin Bieber perform live flock to his YouTube videos. Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images Entertainment hide caption

itoggle caption Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images Entertainment
Justin Bieber

Fans who can't see Justin Bieber perform live flock to his YouTube videos.

Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images Entertainment

After this weekend’s HARD Festival in Los Angeles was canceled at the last minute, South African rap group Die Antwoord must have worked fast to book a show at the El Rey. I still haven’t quite been able to convince myself that the cartoonish duo exists in real life and not just in my nightmares, but the Los Angeles Times says they do, and put on “a riveting performance.”

Jim DeRogatis still likes the Pitchfork Music Festival, but he thinks 2010’s lineup (which looked great on paper: Sleigh Bells + Big Boi + Pavement + LCD Soundsystem + Robyn + Wolf Parade + more) was the sleepiest yet in the five (or six) years of the festival’s existence, thanks mostly to a bunch of young chillwave acts that couldn’t muster much energy. The crew from Time Out Chicago seems to have had a better time, but then, their cohort includes at least a couple of writers (Brent DiCrescenzo and Mia Clarke) who used to call P4k home.

The Associated Press reports that Luo Pinchao, the Cantonese opera singer who was called the “oldest opera singer in the world” by The Guinness Book of World Records, died on Thursday in Guangzhou, according to Chinese news agency Xinhua.

This Recording offers a list of the 50 best songs of 2010 so far.

Justin Bieber’s video for “Baby” featuring Ludacris passed Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance” as the most-watched video of all-time on YouTube with over 250,000,000 views (one for each strand of his perfect hair). How did the Biebs' relatively straightforward dance-off clip beat out Gaga’s brand and reference-filled video? Urlesque says it’s all about appealing to the most powerful (and nefarious) group on the internet, teenage girls.

 

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