The Salt What's On Your Plate

A box of five Cadbury Creme Eggs in London. The confectioner's decision to change the chocolate used to make the outer shell has left many in the U.K. in "shellshock." Anthony Devlin/PA Photos/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Anthony Devlin/PA Photos/Landov

A still-trim Elvis Presley enjoys a sandwich in 1958. His love of fatty foods hadn't caught up to him yet. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Hulton Archive/Getty Images

The classic Spanish roscón is an aromatic, citrus-infused brioche topped by sugar, flaked almonds and candied fruits – arranged like the jewels on a king's crown. It's ubiquitous on Spanish tables on Three Kings Day, Jan. 6. James Badcock for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption James Badcock for NPR

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Abebe, the owner of Abyssinia, a popular Ethiopian eatery in Nairobi, Kenya, shows some of the foods permitted during the pre-Christmas fast. Orthodox Ethiopians typically eat just one vegan meal per day for 40 days before the Christmas feast on Jan. 7. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Gregory Warner/NPR

This copper engraving from approximately 1700 depicts the condition of the English prisoners at the hands of the Dutch. In the 1660s, Cornell University's Eric Tagliacozzo says, the conflict and competition for the spice trade came to a head. "The Dutch decapitated a number of English merchants who were also in the Spice Islands trying to profit from the trade." WikiCommons hide caption

itoggle caption WikiCommons

Pepperpot, a traditional Guyanese Christmas dish, is basically a stew of aromatics and tough meat parts like shanks, trotters and tails that benefit from a long cooking. Courtesy of Cynthia Nelson Photography hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Cynthia Nelson Photography

Australian Christmas today is characterized by gastronomic eclecticism. Many of us have abandoned the old British customs — except for the rich and alcoholic Christmas pudding. Edward Shaw/iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption Edward Shaw/iStockphoto

The rellenong manok at La Cocina de Tita Moning, a restaurant in Manila. Chef Suzette Montinola uses a traditional recipe from the 1930s that belonged to her grandmother. Aurora Almendral for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Aurora Almendral for NPR

Megan Walhood loves the unique toasty potato flavor of lefse. "There's something so comforting about soft, starchy things," she says. Deena Prichep for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Deena Prichep for NPR

The author, Dr. Gavin Francis, arrived at Halley base on Christmas Eve 2002, at the height of the Antarctic midsummer, when 24-hour sunlight illuminates the vast swathes of empty ice. Courtesy of Gavin Francis hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Gavin Francis

In Jerusalem, Syrian Orthodox Christian Nadia Ishaq prepares her burbara porridge with boiled what kernels, raisins, dried plums and dried apricots, topped with ground coconut in the shape of a cross. The holiday honors St. Barbara, an early convert to Christianity whose story is echoed in the Rapunzel tale. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Daniella Cheslow for NPR

Wrapped in gold and silver foil, chocolate gelt are often handed out as a little treat for children (and adults) during Hanukkah. Turns out, the tradition is rooted in real money. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

With over 700 pages and 600 recipes, Mexico: The Cookbook, attempts to document exhaustively the country's varied regional cuisines. Recipes in the book include (from left): potato and chorizo tacos; divorced eggs with tomatillo sauce; and tikin-xik fish, a grouper dish from the Yucatan Peninsula. Courtesy of Fiamma Piacentini-Huff and Phaidon hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Fiamma Piacentini-Huff and Phaidon

Akutaq or agutak — also known as Eskimo ice cream — is a favorite dessert in western Alaska. It's made with berries and frothed with fat, like Crisco. Al Grillo/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Al Grillo/AP

"Greek coffee" may be a matter of national pride in the Mediterranean nation. But increasingly, Greeks are embracing espresso, an imported brew, as their cup of Joe of choice. Pawel Loj/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Pawel Loj/Flickr