The Salt What's On Your Plate

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The 5:2 diet calls for two days per week of minifasting where the aim is to go a long stretch, say 14 to 18 hours, without eating. During these two fasting days, you also eat only about 600 calories, give or take. Viennaslide/the food passionat/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Viennaslide/the food passionat/Corbis

The University of California's Nutrition Policy Institute has proposed that MyPlate include an icon for water. UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources hide caption

itoggle caption UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources

One reason cooking at home might be linked to poor health? Researchers say it could be because there are too many unhealthful baked goods coming out of the oven. Amriphoto/iStockphoto hide caption

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Researchers created the bag on the left as an example of groceries bought in December while those on the right show groceries bought in January. After the New Year, some shoppers add healthier items to their carts but end up taking home more calories than they do during the holidays, a study found. Robyn Wishna/Cornell University hide caption

itoggle caption Robyn Wishna/Cornell University

Researchers say they think there's something in the avocado — other than just the healthy fat — that may lower bad cholesterol. Tastyart Ltd Rob White/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Tastyart Ltd Rob White/Getty Images

The Mediterranean-like DASH and the plant-centric Ornish eating plan topped this year's rankings of diets by a panel assembled by U.S. News & World Report. Gillian Blease/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

itoggle caption Gillian Blease/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Seeing double after toasting? Just wait for the hangover that's coming, thanks in part to those bubbles in sparkling wine. Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Chris Nickels for NPR

When it comes to salty french fries or pizza served at lunch, schools may get more time to dial back sodium content, thanks to a provision in the federal spending bill headed for a vote on Capitol Hill. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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How many calories in that doughnut? A Starbucks coffee shop in New York City displays calorie information next to menu items. New FDA rules will require all chain restaurants and similar eating establishments to post calorie labels. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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John Umland (left) and John Torrens gather donated cans of food in 2011 in Rohnert Park, Calif., for the group Neighbors Organized Against Hunger. Hunger advocates say a lot of nutritionally dense food like canned tuna and beans can be cheaper than processed food. Kent Porter/ZUMA Press/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Kent Porter/ZUMA Press/Corbis

Women who consume eight or more drinks per week are considered excessive drinkers, according to the CDC. Breast cancer, liver disease and heart disease have all been linked to excessive drinking over time. Ann Boyajian/Illustration Works/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Ann Boyajian/Illustration Works/Corbis

When beverage companies like Pepsi create ad campaigns with stars like Beyonce, they're trying to appeal to youth, says Jennifer Harris of the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity. Walter McBride/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Walter McBride/Corbis

Volunteers pass out fresh vegetables for a Thanksgiving meal at the Alameda Food Bank in Alameda, Calif., in 2009. The percentage of Americans who report struggling to afford food has remained stubbornly near recession-era highs. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

These wooden tokens are handed out to shoppers who use SNAP benefits to purchase fresh produce at the Crossroads Farmers Market near Takoma Park, Md. Customers receive tokens worth twice the amount of money withdrawn from their SNAP benefits card — in other words, they get "double bucks." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

The scariest part of the holiday comes in the days that follow, as parents fight and negotiate to limit how much candy their kids eat. NPR's Gisele Grayson decided to pay her kids off to give up their loot. iStockphoto hide caption

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