The Salt What's On Your Plate

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cautions that unpasteurized milk can cause serious illness, because it's a fertile breeding ground for harmful germs like salmonella and E. coli. But such warnings haven't deterred raw milk enthusiasts. Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media hide caption

itoggle caption Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media

A daily cup of joe (or two) may help protect against Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. And an egg a day will not raise the risk of heart disease in healthy people, according to a panel of nutrition experts. Premshee Pillai/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Premshee Pillai/Flickr

Nestle announced that it is removing artificial flavors and colorings from all of its chocolate candy products — including the dyes used to give the inside of a Butterfinger, like this one, that orange hue. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Meredith Rizzo/NPR

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After the pot-smoking comes the insatiable hunger. Just ask James Franco and Seth Rogen's weed-loving characters in Pineapple Express. The Kobal Collection hide caption

itoggle caption The Kobal Collection

One of Dole Packaged Food's frozen fruit options. Over the years, frozen fruit companies have adjusted packaging to make it flashier and more colorful, and also put their products in stand-up bags, says Wall Street Journal reporter, Sarah Nassauer. Dole.com hide caption

itoggle caption Dole.com

Poultry bone broth is typically simmered for 24 hours or more. It can be consumed as a hot beverage, or incorporated into gravies, sauces or soups. Amy Blaszyk for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Amy Blaszyk for NPR

Chef David Iott explains the perfect way to prepare risotto to Stanford students. Courtesy of Stanford's Residential and Dining Enterprises hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Stanford's Residential and Dining Enterprises

The defending champion and favorite remains the chicken wing. But underdog snacks like the carrot are trying to elbow their way into the competition. Leif Parsons for NPR; Source: whologwhy/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Leif Parsons for NPR; Source: whologwhy/Flickr

Ideally, we'd all eat super healthful diets. But that's not the world we live in, and multivitamins may help bridge the nutritional gaps. Jasper White/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jasper White/Getty Images

To get the most nutritional bang for your buck, scientists say blending may beat juicing. Aimee Ray/Flickr; Liz/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Aimee Ray/Flickr; Liz/Flickr

A baked potato with toppings on a lunch tray at a school in Wisconsin. Students are less likely to eat fruits and vegetables if they're rushing to get to recess, researchers say. Micheal Sears/MCT/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Micheal Sears/MCT/Landov

Oh, sugar! If this time of year has you rethinking your diet, there is one surefire change you can make to improve health: Cut back on sugar. Farrukh/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Farrukh/Flickr

A host of new gluten-free products have hit store shelves in recent years, as more people eschew foods containing the protein. Alexa Clark/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Alexa Clark/Flickr

The 5:2 diet calls for two days per week of minifasting where the aim is to go a long stretch, say 14 to 18 hours, without eating. During these two fasting days, you also eat only about 600 calories, give or take. Viennaslide/the food passionat/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Viennaslide/the food passionat/Corbis

The University of California's Nutrition Policy Institute has proposed that MyPlate include an icon for water. UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources hide caption

itoggle caption UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources