Let's Catch Up: Olympic Coaches Won't March; North Korea Wants Games On TV

London Underground employee John Light (!) carries the Olympic torch onto a train at Wimbledon Station. i i

London Underground employee John Light (!) carries the Olympic torch onto a train at Wimbledon Station. LOCOG hide caption

itoggle caption LOCOG
London Underground employee John Light (!) carries the Olympic torch onto a train at Wimbledon Station.

London Underground employee John Light (!) carries the Olympic torch onto a train at Wimbledon Station.

LOCOG

Good morning. With three days until the official opener of the 2012 London Games, here's a summary of the news coming out of the Olympics:

  • U.S. (and other) coaches will not be walking in Friday's Opening Ceremonies, because Olympic honchos wanted to shorten the ceremony. Some don't even have tickets.
  • The Olympic torch had a big night. First, it rode on the London Underground. Then it passed through the set of long-running soap opera Eastenders.
  • North Korea is negotiating for rights to broadcast the 2012 games, according to Voice of America. Seems a bit late, but I guess if a dictatorship doesn't let you set your own deadlines, what good is it?
  • Brazil's soccer team won't have goalie Rafael for the games, after he ran into a practice dummy during practice. Out for three weeks with an elbow injury.
  • The British government has deployed even more troops to help secure Olympic venues.
  • And... London Mayor Boris Johnson recited a Pindaric ode in Greek and English at a gala last night.

As is the case with most poems, the meat's at the bottom — just like Shepherd's Pie. So, here are the ode's final two stanzas, in English:

The pipes will play, the drum resound, as medallists are daily crowned; the crowd's hurrah will reach the skies when victors hoist the golden prize.

Now welcome to this sea­‐girt land, with London's Mayor and co. at hand. Good luck to all who strive to win: applaud, and let the Games begin!

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.