International

Bomb Attack In Karachi Kills Many; U.S. Opens Terror 'Front' In Yemen

Good morning.

As we reported earlier, the latest news from Iran is all about renewed anger aimed at the government and the regime's brutal response.

And we also reported earlier about the rising number of questions about why a man who allegedly tried to blow up a plane as it approached Detroit was ever allowed to board the jet.

As for other stories making headines, they include:

— BBC News — "Bomb Attack On Processions In Pakistani City Of Karachi": "At least 15 people have been killed in a bomb attack on a religious procession in the southern Pakistani city of Karachi, officials say. Television footage showed a large plume of smoke over the site of the blast and ambulances rushing to the scene."

The New York Times — "U.S. Wides Terror War To Yemen": "In the midst of two unfinished major wars, the United States has quietly opened a third, largely covert front against al-Qaida in Yemen."

— Bloomberg News — "Holiday Retail Sales Rose An Estimated 3.6%, SpendingPulse Says": "U.S. retail sales rose an estimated 3.6% this holiday season from a year earlier, helped by online shopping and purchases of electronics, data from MasterCard Advisors' SpendingPulse showed. ... The National Retail Federation has predicted a 1% decline in U.S. spending for the season. The International Council of Shopping Centers, another trade group, anticipates a 2% increase in sales at stores open at least a year."

Morning Edition — After Nearly A Year, Obama's Agenda Is Still A "Work In Progress". NPR's Scott Horsley talked with guest host Linda Wertheimer about the President Barack Obama's first year in office:

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The Indianapolis Star— NFL's Colts Are No Longer Perfect; Once Again, No Team Will Be Undefeated.

St. Petersburg Times— University Of Florida Football Coach Urban Meyer "Unresigns, Takes Leave Of Absence."

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