America

Burger King Rolls Out The Beer Barrel

Whopper Bar. i i

A Whopper Bar in Germany already serves beer. Burger King is about to become the first of the big three fast-food chains in the U.S. to add beer to its menu in selected locations. Miguel Villagran/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Miguel Villagran/Getty Images
Whopper Bar.

A Whopper Bar in Germany already serves beer. Burger King is about to become the first of the big three fast-food chains in the U.S. to add beer to its menu in selected locations.

Miguel Villagran/Getty Images

Burger King may be number three after McDonalds and Subway in terms of sales in the fast-food restaurant business. But it plans to be the first of the top three chains in at least one area — serving beer. And I'm not talking about the root beer.

Reports are that Burger King will be serving beer at a location in Miami Beach which will be the first in the chain to serve alcohol.

The Associated Press reports:

At the Whopper Bar South Beach, guests can pair a Whopper sandwich with Anheuser-Busch and MillerCoors brews. With fries, the combo will run $7.99.

The restaurant will offer outdoor dining, a walk-up window and delivery service.

It's scheduled to open mid-February. The announcement was made Friday.

Morningstar analyst R.J. Hottovy says adding beer at selected locations around the world is part of Miami-based Burger King's effort to reinvent itself as a fast-food restaurant with a sit-down feel.

Evidently, fast-food restaurants, referred to as quick-service restaurants by insiders, are looking for ways to slow their customers down so they spend more time at the restaurants, the thinking being the longer customers remain in the restaurant the more likely they are to buy desserts and such, adding to the operator's profit margins. Beer should certainly do the trick in slowing down a lot of customers.

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