America

'Miracle On The Hudson' Jet To Be Sold — Though We Can't Say When

In this file photo from Jan. 15, 2009, airline passengers wait to be rescued on the wings of a US Ai i i

Bids are welcome. Steven Day/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Steven Day/AP
In this file photo from Jan. 15, 2009, airline passengers wait to be rescued on the wings of a US Ai

Bids are welcome.

Steven Day/AP

As the Associated Press and The New York Times have both felt obliged to say, "hero not included".

That hero would be US Airways Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger and the subject of those and many other stories the past couple days is the news that the Airbus A320 he successfully ditched in the Hudson River a little more than a year ago is being auctioned off.

Intrigued by the prospect of a piece of recent history coming on the market, we sought more information:

It turns out that Chartis, an insurance company, is behind the sale. It has posted photos of the jet here and has posted a note that says:

Due to the volume of interest in aircraft N106US, we will provide additional and necessary information in the near future so that all interested parties can be accommodated. Thank you for your interest in the aircraft.

What about MSNBC's report that the auction closes on March 27? Chartis spokeswoman Marie Ali said she couldn't confirm that. Had something changed since MSNBC said that last week? Ali said she couldn't comment. How could someone who's interested find out more information about the auction? Ali said she couldn't comment.

All she could say, Ali responded to each of our questions, was that the plane is to be sold.

Well, not quite all of the plane, it appears. According to the AP, it comes without its two engines (one of which came off on impact). Also, says MSNBC, the wings have been detached.

Of course, one thing's for sure: There has been some water damage.

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