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Out-Of-Control Duck Feeder May Be On Loose In Indiana

Muncie, Indiana may have just experienced the mother of all duck feedings.

Hundreds if not thousands of pieces of bread were dumped onto the banks of the White River according to the StarPress newspaper website. (Photo.)

The simile in the lead paragraph of the story is weirdly over-the-top, like something out of a Tim Burton movie. But you get the idea.

MUNCIE — Hundreds of breads, bagels and buns litter the banks of the White River like bodies left behind in a battle between baked goods.

The food was intended to feed Muncie's hungry.

Instead it is feeding Muncie's geese, ducks, mice, rats and the occasional beagle, and creating an eyesore in the process.

"I'm in disbelief that somebody could dump that much bread, even if they say they have the good intention of feeding the ducks or geese," said Toni Cecil, a construction compliance inspector with Muncie Delaware County Stormwater Management. "It's illegal dumping."

The mess along Bunch Boulevard near Jackson Street looks like it would fill the bed of a small pickup truck.

And just how it got there remains a mystery.

Police were dispatched to investigate the dump early last week, apparently after someone from the city's sanitation department spotted the mess.

Muncie police Sgt. Bruce Qualls recognized the baked goods as the product of Panera Bread, a chain cafe on the city's north side.

At the end of every business day, Panera Bread gives away their unsold baked goods to charitable organizations to feed the hungry.

Panera Bread management assured Qualls that they would look into the situation and Qualls agreed to end his investigation.

"They assured me they would make contact with them and let them know it wasn't acceptable," Qualls said.

The story leaves you wondering how Qualls, the police sergeant, was able to recognize the bread products as being from the Panera chain? Was it as simple as he spotted a Panera bag? Or is he a bread expert?

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