America

Prius Crash In N.Y. Was Driver's Fault, Not A Problem With The Car, Police Say

A 2005 Toyota Prius, which was in an accident, is seen at a police station in Harrison, New York, We i

The driver stomped on the wrong pedal, police say. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Seth Wenig/AP
A 2005 Toyota Prius, which was in an accident, is seen at a police station in Harrison, New York, We

The driver stomped on the wrong pedal, police say.

Seth Wenig/AP

From Harrison, N.Y., The Journal News writes that:

"Driver error, not a stuck accelerator, caused a Toyota Prius to crash into a stone wall on Purchase Street earlier this month, acting police chief Capt. Anthony Marraccini said Monday."

So, one high-profile incident involving one of the automaker's cars would appear to have had nothing to do with the sticky accelerator problem that has forced Toyota to recall millions of vehicles.

According to the police, the 56-year-old driver thought she had put her foot on the 2005 Prius' brake — but evidence, including data from the vehicle's "black box", indicates she instead had her foot on the accelerator. The driver is not facing any charges, according to the Journal News, because police do not think she intended to deceive anyone.

Still unresolved: Just what caused a 2008 Prius to hit speeds in excess of 90 mph on a California highway earlier this month. The driver says it was out of control. Toyota has said its tests can't explain the incident.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.