Economy

UConn Women's Basketball Team Aims For Record 71 Straight Wins

Monday will be a notable day in college basketball history as arguably the nation's most dominant college basketball team tries to extend its win streak to a record 71 games.

If the University of Connecticut women's team beats Notre Dame in the Big East semifinals Monday night, the team will surpass its own prior record streak of 70 games in women's NCAA Division 1 basketball. The Huskies tied their prior longest streak Sunday, set in 2001-2003, with a 77-41 victory over Syracuse University.

To win 70 games when every other team hopes to make its season by beating you is a fairly staggering achievement that raises further the already high pedestal the Connecticut women's program stands on.

Led by two of the best all-around players in the nation, male or female, senior Tina Charles and junior Maya Moore, the Huskies have been so dominant that they are reminding students of basketball of the legendary UCLA teams coached by the Wizard of Westwood, John Wooden.

His teams between 1971 to 1974, led by center Bill Walton, won 88 games before being defeated by Notre Dame. (Strange how the Fighting Irish once again have the chance to be a spoiler Monday night.) While no one calls him a wizard, Huskies coach Geno Auriemma draws plenty of praise for an offensive system no other team has yet been able to figure out how to stop.

Just how much better than the competition has this team been? They've won no game by less than 10 points with the average being 32 points. Some basketball fans bemoan this extraordinary record as "boring" which suggests that even excellence has its critics.

ESPN's Melanie Jackson has compiled a list of some of the most significant games in the streak. Unfortunately, ESPN won't be carrying Monday's game on its main channels, a home game for the Huskies at Hartford's XL Center, at 6 pm.

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