America

Obama Makes Father's Day Nod To 2-Dad Families

President Barack Obama's second Father's Day proclamation has a notable difference from his first. It openly acknowledges gay parents, noting that some kids have two dads.

An excerpt:

Nurturing families come in many forms, and children may be raised by a father and mother, a single father, two fathers, a stepfather, a grandfather, or caring guardian. We owe a special debt of gratitude for those parents serving in the United States Armed Forces and their families, whose sacrifices protect the lives and liberties of all American children. For the character they build, the doors they open, and the love they provide over our life times, all our fathers deserve our unending appreciation and admiration.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of theUnited States of America, in accordance with a joint resolution of the Congress approved April 24, 1972, as amended (36 U.S.C.109), do hereby proclaim June 20, 2010, as Father's Day... IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand ten, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth.

BARACK OBAMA

The 2010 Father's Day proclamation is similar to this year's Mother's Day document.

The president's first Father's Day proclamation didn't specifically mention gay families which, again, was similar to his 2009 Mother's Day document which also lacked an overt mention.

As my NPR colleague Liz Halloran points out, this appears to be the first time presidential Mother's Day and Father's Day proclamations have so openly referred to gay parents.

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