America

S.C. Senate Candidate Alvin Greene Delivers First Campaign Speech

Yesterday afternoon, in a junior high gymnasium, Senate candidate Alvin Greene made his first speech at his first campaign event.

At a National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) meeting in Manning, South Carolina, Greene "avoided any major gaffes ... as he hit his three major themes of jobs, education and justice," the Associated Press reports.

The speech started off with a joke and ended with Greene timidly waving, a shy smile spreading across his face as he got a standing ovation before a friendly audience in his hometown of Manning.

He even opened with a joke: "I am the best candidate in the US Senate race here in SC. I am also the best choice for the [NAACP] Image Award next year."

New York magazine may have characterized it best: "Alvin Greene's First Speech Surprisingly Without Incident."

Perhaps the most surprising thing about Alvin Greene’s first speech since his unlikely primary win weeks ago was that there was nothing really that surprising about it (and that, disappointingly, there were no plugs for action figures).

According to The State, it was a scene, with "more than 400 people — including a throng of state and national media."

The 300 seats set up for Greene’s first public appearance since unexpectedly winning the June 8 primary were all filled. The parking lot of the relatively new school was filled with cars and news media trucks.

And counting the 15 video cameras trained on the stage, it was a packed house.

In November, Greene, an unemployed veteran, will challenge incumbent Sen. Jim DeMint (R-SC) and Tom Clements, a Green Party candidate.

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