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Daniel Schorr, Venerable NPR Newsman, Dead At 93

  • During a career of more than six decades, Daniel Schorr earned many awards for journalistic excellence, including three Emmys.
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    During a career of more than six decades, Daniel Schorr earned many awards for journalistic excellence, including three Emmys.
    Paula Darte for NPR
  • A child of Belarussian immigrants, Schorr was born in the Bronx in 1916. He got his first scoop at age 12, when he saw the body of a woman who had jumped or fallen from the roof of his apartment building. He called the police and the Bronx Home News. The paper paid him $5 for the information.
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    A child of Belarussian immigrants, Schorr was born in the Bronx in 1916. He got his first scoop at age 12, when he saw the body of a woman who had jumped or fallen from the roof of his apartment building. He called the police and the Bronx Home News. The paper paid him $5 for the information.
  • In his autobiography Staying Tuned:  A Life In Journalism, Schorr writes that in high school, he was president of the Hebrew Society, managing editor of the senior yearbook, and a member of the History Honor Society and the school paper.
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    In his autobiography Staying Tuned: A Life In Journalism, Schorr writes that in high school, he was president of the Hebrew Society, managing editor of the senior yearbook, and a member of the History Honor Society and the school paper.
  • Schorr served in U.S. Army intelligence during World War II.
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    Schorr served in U.S. Army intelligence during World War II.
  • Schorr joined CBS News in 1953 as its diplomatic correspondent in Washington, D.C., and also traveled on assignment to Latin America, Europe and Asia.
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    Schorr joined CBS News in 1953 as its diplomatic correspondent in Washington, D.C., and also traveled on assignment to Latin America, Europe and Asia.
  • Schorr used a typewriter to file his scripts, but sent his first script via e-mail in December 2009.
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    Schorr used a typewriter to file his scripts, but sent his first script via e-mail in December 2009.
  • Schorr was one of "Murrow's boys," the celebrated news team put together by Edward R. Murrow at CBS in the 1940s.
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    Schorr was one of "Murrow's boys," the celebrated news team put together by Edward R. Murrow at CBS in the 1940s.
  • In 1955, Schorr opened a CBS bureau in Moscow. "CBS seemed not at all displeased when I was periodically cut off the air ... for defying censorship, and finally excluded from Russia altogether."
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    In 1955, Schorr opened a CBS bureau in Moscow. "CBS seemed not at all displeased when I was periodically cut off the air ... for defying censorship, and finally excluded from Russia altogether."
  • Schorr's 2 1/2-year stay in Moscow culminated in the first-ever exclusive television interview with a Soviet leader, Nikita Khrushchev — filmed in his Kremlin office in 1957 for CBS' Face the Nation. From left are Khrushchev, the show's host Stuart Novins, journalist B.J. Cutler and Schorr.
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    Schorr's 2 1/2-year stay in Moscow culminated in the first-ever exclusive television interview with a Soviet leader, Nikita Khrushchev — filmed in his Kremlin office in 1957 for CBS' Face the Nation. From left are Khrushchev, the show's host Stuart Novins, journalist B.J. Cutler and Schorr.
    CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images
  • From 1957 to 1959, Schorr reported from Washington and the United Nations. He covered Khrushchev's tumultuous tour of the U.S. and the rise of Fidel Castro in Havana, and traveled with President Eisenhower to South America, Asia and Europe.
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    From 1957 to 1959, Schorr reported from Washington and the United Nations. He covered Khrushchev's tumultuous tour of the U.S. and the rise of Fidel Castro in Havana, and traveled with President Eisenhower to South America, Asia and Europe.
    AP
  • Daniel Schorr interviews the mayor of West Berlin, Willy Brandt, in 1962.
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    Daniel Schorr interviews the mayor of West Berlin, Willy Brandt, in 1962.
  • Schorr covers a visit by Sen. Robert Kennedy to the poverty-stricken Mississippi Delta in 1967.
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    Schorr covers a visit by Sen. Robert Kennedy to the poverty-stricken Mississippi Delta in 1967.
  • Broadcast journalist Walter Cronkite stands before a group of television monitors showing the CBS News Correspondents for the show Eyewitness. Schorr is seen at the top right. Also pictured: Charles Kuralt, David Schoenbrun, Marvin Kalb, Winston Brudett and Howard K. Smith.
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    Broadcast journalist Walter Cronkite stands before a group of television monitors showing the CBS News Correspondents for the show Eyewitness. Schorr is seen at the top right. Also pictured: Charles Kuralt, David Schoenbrun, Marvin Kalb, Winston Brudett and Howard K. Smith.
    CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images
  • Schorr works at a press table during the Watergate hearings on June 1, 1973, while on assignment for CBS News.
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    Schorr works at a press table during the Watergate hearings on June 1, 1973, while on assignment for CBS News.
    Gjon Mili//Time Life Pictures/Getty Images
  • Schorr appears before the Senate Judiciary subcommittee on constitutional rights to testify as the subject of an FBI investigation, on Feb. 1, 1972. The Nixon White House said it ordered the investigation because Schorr was being considered for a federal job — one which Schorr said he knew nothing about.
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    Schorr appears before the Senate Judiciary subcommittee on constitutional rights to testify as the subject of an FBI investigation, on Feb. 1, 1972. The Nixon White House said it ordered the investigation because Schorr was being considered for a federal job — one which Schorr said he knew nothing about.
    Bob Daugherty/AP
  • CIA Director George Bush (left) exchanges words with Schorr on Feb. 18, 1976, prior to giving a closed-door briefing to members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.
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    CIA Director George Bush (left) exchanges words with Schorr on Feb. 18, 1976, prior to giving a closed-door briefing to members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.
    Henry Griffin/AP
  • Schorr appears before the House ethics committee in Washington, on Sept. 15, 1976. Schorr refused to tell the panel the name of the source who leaked a copy of a secret House Intelligence Committee report. Behind him is his wife, Lisbeth.
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    Schorr appears before the House ethics committee in Washington, on Sept. 15, 1976. Schorr refused to tell the panel the name of the source who leaked a copy of a secret House Intelligence Committee report. Behind him is his wife, Lisbeth.
    Bob Daugherty/AP
  • In 1979, Schorr was among the first hired by Ted Turner and Reese Schoenfeld to deliver commentary and news analysis on the fledgling Cable News Network (CNN).
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    In 1979, Schorr was among the first hired by Ted Turner and Reese Schoenfeld to deliver commentary and news analysis on the fledgling Cable News Network (CNN).
  • Schorr is pictured in 1982 with a 10-foot satellite dish in front of his home in Washington, D.C.'s Cleveland Park neighborhood. In 1979, Ted Turner gave him the dish — the first residential one to be installed in the city — after hiring Schorr, then 62, as the marquee correspondent for CNN.
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    Schorr is pictured in 1982 with a 10-foot satellite dish in front of his home in Washington, D.C.'s Cleveland Park neighborhood. In 1979, Ted Turner gave him the dish — the first residential one to be installed in the city — after hiring Schorr, then 62, as the marquee correspondent for CNN.
    Diana Walker/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images
  • Schorr talks about his book Staying Tuned: A Life in Journalism, May 6, 2001, on Meet the Press at the NBC studios in Washington, D.C.
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    Schorr talks about his book Staying Tuned: A Life in Journalism, May 6, 2001, on Meet the Press at the NBC studios in Washington, D.C.
    Alex Wong/Newsmakers
  • Schorr covers the 2006 U.S. House elections from NPR's Studio 4A on Nov. 7, 2006. Schorr worked primarily as a senior news analyst for NPR after leaving CNN in 1985.
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    Schorr covers the 2006 U.S. House elections from NPR's Studio 4A on Nov. 7, 2006. Schorr worked primarily as a senior news analyst for NPR after leaving CNN in 1985.
  • Schorr is seen with his son, Jonathan, wife, Lisbeth, and daughter, Lisa, in this family photo.
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    Schorr is seen with his son, Jonathan, wife, Lisbeth, and daughter, Lisa, in this family photo.
    Courtesy of Daniel Schorr
  • Working for NPR, Schorr contributed regularly to All Things Considered, Weekend Edition Saturday, Weekend Edition Sunday, and NPR live coverage of breaking news.
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    Working for NPR, Schorr contributed regularly to All Things Considered, Weekend Edition Saturday, Weekend Edition Sunday, and NPR live coverage of breaking news.

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It's a sad day for the NPR family and journalism in general. Daniel Schorr, the legendary broadcast journalist whose career spanned from the Edward R. Murrow era of the 1950s to news blogs, died Friday at age 93.

Dan’s was a voice well known to regular NPR listeners who since 1985 have heard his analysis during NPR's news programs.

But he was a fixture in American journalism for decades before that, distinguishing himself as both a foreign correspondent who chronicled the Cold War and later, as a stateside reporter who covered, among other stories, the unfolding of the Watergate scandal.

Indeed it was during Watergate that the world learned that Dan held a special status for the operatives in the Nixon White House. He had made it onto President Nixon's infamous "enemies’ list."

Contrary to how the Nixonistas viewed it, journalists saw that as a badge of honor, holding Dan in especially high esteem because of the kind of enemies he made.

Dan was the last surviving broadcast journalist who was one of Murrow's Boys, hired by the iconic newsman who set the standard for broadcast journalism excellence.

A little more detail from our NPR.org obituary.

Schorr was born in the Bronx in 1916, the son of Belorussian immigrants. He got his first scoop at age 12, when he saw the body of a woman who had jumped or fallen from the roof of his apartment building. He called the police — and the Bronx Home News, which paid him $5 for the information.

"It was the first time I'd ever seen a dead person in my life," he told NPR's Robert Siegel in a 2006 interview on All Things Considered marking Schorr's 90th birthday.

That's where his life in journalism started. And it continued until this year. Until recently, Dan was a presence at NPR headquarters. He could often be seen pushing his walker ahead of him as he headed into a studio to record a segment.

For anyone who loves journalism, and its history, it was really cool sight. And it was even better knowing he was a colleague.

Sometimes when an era ends, it's hard to tell in the moment. It's only later that you realize it.

Not today. All of us know something very important has ended with his passing. And we are sadder for that knowledge. Our sincerest sympathies to his family, friends and fans.

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