America

Excited About The Midterm Elections? Gallup: If You're Not, You're Not Alone

Schumer And Rep. Van Hollen Discuss Bill To Undo Citizens United Ruling i i

This man -- Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee -- has his work cut out for him. Alex Wong/Getty Images North America hide caption

itoggle caption Alex Wong/Getty Images North America
Schumer And Rep. Van Hollen Discuss Bill To Undo Citizens United Ruling

This man -- Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee -- has his work cut out for him.

Alex Wong/Getty Images North America

According to Gallup, as November approaches, the American electorate isn't too excited about the upcoming midterms.

Surprised?

"The percentage of registered voters 'very enthusiastic' about voting this November fell to 31 percent for July 26-Aug. 1," it reports.

That's bad news for both parties, of course, but surveyed Democratic voters are markedly less enthusiastic than their Republican counterparts:

"Their latest 22 percent 'very enthusiastic' figure is the lowest seen thus far in 2010, whereas the Republicans' 44 percent matches their average for the year."

Gallup Survey Results
Gallup/Gallup

Last week, on the heels of the passage and enactment of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, enthusiasm among GOP voters reached 51 percent, "similar to the increase to 54 percent seen after passage of healthcare reform in March, but these swells have since dissipated."

On his blog, The Atlantic's Andrew Sullivan parses the data:

Barring some August surprise, this is largely set till September. Here's what I think has not been factored in: the president has barely begun to make his case for his first year and a half. The case is much stronger on fundamentals, in my view, than is now believed. I don't doubt that the GOP will do well this fall. What i do doubt is that it's based on anything more than protest in an amnesiac era of no good choices, and almost no margin for error either.

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