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Police Suspect Serial Killer In VA, MI Racial Stabbings

Michigan serial killer sketch

This composite sketch provided by the Michigan State Police of the knife-wielding serial killer suspect of racial attacks in at least two states. Anonymous/Michigan State Police hide caption

itoggle caption Anonymous/Michigan State Police

Police in a Washington, D.C. suburb are saying publicly they suspect that stabbings of dark-skinned men there are linked to similar racial attacks, including several fatal ones, in Flint, Michigan.

The police chief of Leesburg, Va., about 40 miles northwest of the nation's capital, said several unprovoked stabbings there of black men and a dark-skinned Hispanic man appear linked to the Michigan stabbings because of similar descriptions of the assailant and his car. Racial hatred is presumed to be the motive in the attacks.

From the Washington Post:

A white man who stabbed or attacked three dark-skinned men in Leesburg this month is probably the "Flint serial killer," thought to have killed five men and wounded 10 — almost all of them black — in Michigan, police said Monday.

The unprovoked Virginia assaults began Aug. 3, when a teenager out for a nighttime jog suddenly felt a sharp pain, then turned to see a man who had plunged a knife in his back. Two days later and a short distance away, police think, the same assailant stabbed a 67-year-old man who was sitting on the stoop outside his apartment. Then, on Friday, the attacker asked a man for help fixing a dark-green sport-utility vehicle, then struck the good Samaritan in the head with a hammer.

Leesburg Police Chief Joseph R. Price said he is confident the man wanted in Flint is the same person attacking men in Loudoun County. There are striking similarities in the methods of the attacks, but the strongest evidence is the specific description of the suspect's green SUV, which is nearly identical in both locations.

Worth noting is that the Flint, Mich. police weren't as ready to say the attacks were linked because of the lack as of yet of hard evidence establishing the connection.

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