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From Kabul To New Haven: Gen. Stanley McChrystal To Teach At Yale University

Retirement Ceremony Held For Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal i i

Gen. Stanley McChrystal will teach a course on leadership at Yale University, as a lecturer there. Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images
Retirement Ceremony Held For Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal

Gen. Stanley McChrystal will teach a course on leadership at Yale University, as a lecturer there.

Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images

Just weeks after resigning from his command in Afghanistan, and retiring from a 34-year career in the U.S. Army, Gen. Stanley McChrystal has accepted a faculty appointment at Yale University, where he will be Senior Fellow at The Jackson Institute for Global Affairs.

According to the Yale University Office of Public Affairs & Communications, "General McChrystal, former Commander of the International Security Assistance Force and Commander of United States Forces Afghanistan, will teach a graduate level seminar for students in the International Relations Master’s program."

The course will examine how dramatic changes in globalization have increased the complexity of modern leadership.  Jackson Institute Senior Fellows are practitioners and experts in global affairs who teach courses and mentor Yale students aspiring to public and international service.

According to POLITICO's Gordon Lubold, who broke the news of the announcement this morning, "McChrystal will join John Negroponte, the former U.S. ambassador and former deputy secretary of State, as well as former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo at the Institute."

McChrystal had been considering a number of opportunities from a wide range of places, from large corporations to non-governmental organizations and even some wounded warrior groups seeking his leadership, sources said. And he will undoubtedly have a future on the speaker’s circuit.

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