Economy

QB Brett Favre: One And Done

Brett Favre

Minnesota Vikings quarterback Brett Favre strikes a familiar pose during what he says will be his last NFL training camp. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jim Mone/AP

It's hard to be a football fan and not welcome Brett Favre's decision announced Wednesday to return to play one more year in the NFL, his last, he said. Many Green Bay fans would be the exception, of course.

Favre is one of the most exciting, scrappy, passionate and durable quarterbacks in NFL history. No one else currently playing comes close.

He more than makes up for indecision off the football field in recent years when it comes to whether to keep playing or retire with his decisiveness on the field under center.

We only hope the 40-year old future Hall of Famer avoids serious injury and that he and his Minnesota Vikings perform well enough so that he finishes his career without all of us saying at year's end, "He just stayed one year too long, didn't he?"

As NPR's Tom Goldman reported for the network's newscast, Favre had indicated he wasn't coming back until all indications were that he was:

TOM: ... Brett Favre recently said he wouldn't be back because a surgically repaired ankle wasn't healing fast enough.

But this week, three of his vikings' teammates flew to Favre's home in Mississippi to urge Favre to play.  Wednesday, he was at team headquarters practicing and then telling reporters he owes it to the Vikings to play a final season.

FAVRE: I really felt like what we had this past year was special and it's worth giving one more try.

TOM: Last season was one of Favre's best - he threw 33 touchdown passes and only seven interceptions.

He almost led the Vikings to the Super Bowl - but they lost to New Orleans in the NFC championship game, in part because Favre threw a late-game interception.

Favre and Minnesota get an early shot at revenge - they open the regular season against the Super Bowl champion Saints.

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