America

MSNBC Rejects MoveOn.org's Anti-Target Ad

MoveOn.org had planned to retaliate against retail giant Target Inc.'s large monetary donation to a Republican group supporting an anti-gay rights conservative for Minnesota governor by taking out a national TV ad on MSNBC.

It looks like the liberal group will need to move on to Plan B. MSNBC, the cable channel known for its left-leaning hosts like Rachel Maddow, rejected the MoveOn.org ad Thursday.

A snippet from the Associated Press:

MSNBC spokeswoman Alana Russo said Thursday that the commercial submitted by the liberal advocacy group MoveOn.org violates its advertising policy by attacking an individual business directly. The ad features Target's bullseye logo and accuses the chain of trying to buy elections.

MoveOn executive director Justin Ruben said the rejection was "the height of hypocrisy" and accused MSNBC and its corporate parent, General Electric Co., of trying to protect Target from consumer anger.

Here's the ad MSNBC banned:

The ad is playing on local TV stations in Minneapolis. MoveOn.org is presumably trying to torment Target officials. Another AP excerpt:

MoveOn spokeswoman Ilyse Hogue said the ad began runningThursday on ABC, CBS and NBC affiliates in the Twin Cities. Theaffiliates, KSTP, WCCO and KARE, confirmed that the ad was airing.

Target's CEO, Gregg Steinhafel, has apologized for his company's $150,000 donation to MN Forward which is supporting the candidacy of Republican Tom Emmer for governor.

Target has explained that it really was trying to support the pro-business policies that MN Forward advocates for, nothing more. And it points to what some consider a relatively positive track record on same-sex issues, including domestic partnership policies and benefits it says should count for plenty.

Unfortunately for Target, its track doesn't appear to be cutting much isce with MoveOn.org and other critics who have called for a boycott of the company.

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