America

Tax Breaks; New Poll On NYC Islamic Center; New Attack In Pakistan

Good morning.

As we've already reported, Hurricane Earl is making its way up the East Coast and looks like it may cause some trouble for folks on Long Island, Nantucket and in Nova Scotia. But as with all hurricanes, if you're near the projected path, stay alert. Things can change quickly.

We've also already previewed the August unemployment report, which is due out at 8:30 a.m. ET. Check back with us when that time arrives. We'll pass the news along as quickly as possible.

Those aren't the only stories making headlines, of course. Some of the others include:

The Washington Post — "White House Considers Pre-Midterm Package Of Business Tax Breaks To Spur Hiring": "With just two months until the November elections, the White House is seriously weighing a package of business tax breaks - potentially worth hundreds of billions of dollars - to spur hiring and combat Republican charges that Democratic tax policies hurt small businesses, according to people with knowledge of the deliberations."

— NPR News — "Mideast Leaders Agree To 2nd Round Of Talks": "Mideast leaders meeting in the U.S. capital agreed Thursday on a schedule for ongoing peace talks, aimed at resolving decades of deadly conflict in one year. Former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell said Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu have agreed to hold a second round of talks on Sept. 14-15 in the Middle East, and then the two sides will meet every two weeks."

The New York Times — " New Yorkers Want Islamic Center Moved, Poll Finds": "Two-thirds of New York City residents want a planned Muslim community center and mosque to be relocated to a less controversial site farther away from ground zero in Lower Manhattan, including many who describe themselves as supporters of the project, according to a New York Times poll."

— NPR News Investigations — "Massey Execs' Access To Mine After Blast Questioned": "An NPR News investigation has revealed new concerns about what happened in the hours after the explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine in West Virginia, where 29 mineworkers died in April. Two officials from mine owner Massey Energy were underground unsupervised for four hours after the blast." The company says the men "risked their lives to save fellow coal miners. ... These rescue efforts were their one and only objective."

— BBC News — More Than 20 Killed In Pakistan Bombing: "At least 22 people have died in a bomb (attack) at a Shia Muslim rally in the south-western Pakistani city of Quetta. Many others were injured in the explosion, which took place in the Meezan Chowk area. The blast was followed by firing, reports said. It was a Palestinian solidarity march organised by Shia Muslim students."

In Quetta, Sept. 3, people scramble to safety after a bomb attack.

Injured people lie down on a road and scramble to safety after an explosion during a Shiite procession in Quetta, Pakistan, today. Arshad Butt/Associated Press hide caption

itoggle caption Arshad Butt/Associated Press

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.