Economy

Best App Ever

sunset
istockphoto

"Last Wednesday, my life changed forever. I got an iPhone." That's how Austin Seraphin's review begins on his blog. But Seraphin isn't your normal tech-loving Apple Geek. He's legally blind, he can see some light and color, he says, "but just in blurs, and objects don't really have a color, just light sources." But then he downloaded Color Identifier, an app which uses the iPhone's camera and then speaks the color. And a world opened up to him.

The next day, I went outside. I looked at the sky. I heard colors such as "Horizon," "Outer Space," and many shades of blue and gray. I used color cues to find my pumpkin plants, by looking for the green among the brown and stone. I spent ten minutes looking at my pumpkin plants, with their leaves of green and lemon-ginger. I then roamed my yard, and saw a blue flower. I then found the brown shed, and returned to the gray house. My mind felt blown. I watched the sun set, listening to the colors change as the sky darkened. The next night, I had a conversation with mom about how the sky looked bluer tonight. Since I can see some light and color, I think hearing the color names can help nudge my perception, and enhance my visual experience.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: