Economy

Tina Brown: Merger Of 'Newsweek' And 'Daily Beast' Amplifies Both

"I've never been one who kissed off the world of print," Tina Brown just told Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep as the two talked about the media business story of the day — the merger of Brown's online The Daily Beast with an old standby of the magazine world, Newsweek.

"I'm looking, really, back at print now with kind of the new eyes of an expatriate who has been away and now can sort of look back and see something with (a) very different point of view," said Brown, who will now edit both Newsweek and The Daily Beast.

And, added the former editor of The New Yorker, Vanity Fair and the short-lived Talk magazine, "having done so much Web news now, I can actually see what a magazine can offer, which is unique in the marketplace ... is a different kind of narrative  rhythm. ... In a magazine you can be more reflective."

Here's the entire conversation Steve had with Brown:

Steve Inskeep talks with Tina Brown

Over at The Daily Beast, Brown told readers that:

"It's a wonderful new opportunity for all the brilliant editors and writers at The Daily Beast who have worked so hard to create the site’s success. Working at the warp-speed of a 24/7 news operation, we now add the versatility of being able to develop ideas and investigations that require a different narrative pace suited to the medium of print. And for Newsweek, The Daily Beast is a thriving frontline of breaking news and commentary that will raise the profile of the magazine’s bylines and quicken the pace of a great magazine’s revival. I'm impressed with how Newsweek's outstanding staff has continued to put out a lively, well-informed magazine after the departure of their tireless editor, Jon Meacham."

The New York Times reports that "terms of the deal call for 50-50 control. The new company will be named the Newsweek Daily Beast Company."

News of the merger was broken last evening by The New York Observer, which reported that "Newsweek owner Sidney Harman, 92, and IAC chairman Barry Diller had for weeks disagreed over an operating structure for the hybrid publication. The deal ... establishes a daily role for Mr. Harman and strong editorial independence for Ms. Brown." Diller's IAC/InterActive Corp. finances The Daily Beast.

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