Economy

Reports: Facebook Email To Be Announced Today

The Facebook homepage is seen on a compu

hide captionWill Facebook soon be your email service as well?

NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP

TechCrunch, and other blogs, are reporting it's known inside Facebook as "the Gmail killer". Facebook is holding a "special event" today at a San Francisco hotel where they're expected to announce their new email service. The land rush on getting an "@fb.com" or "@facebook.com" (or whatever they decide to use) will likely be, well, dramatic.

Called "Project Titan" internally, TechCrunch says Facebook email makes a lot of sense.

Facebook has the world’s most popular photos product, the most popular events product, and soon will have a very popular local deals product as well.  It can tweak the design of its webmail client to display content from each of these in a seamless fashion (and don’t forget messages from games, or payments via Facebook Credits). And there’s also the social element: Facebook knows who your friends are and how closely you’re connected to them; it can probably do a pretty good job figuring out which personal emails you want to read most and prioritize them accordingly.

Last week Google and Facebook went at it over importing contacts from one service to another, you can read all about it here, but the thinking is that the two companies are facing off more and more, with Facebook likely to offer email today, and rumors that Google is going to offer a competing social network soon.

In other email news, AOL has launched a revamp of its email product. Called "Project Phoenix" (when you name a project Phoenix you should know it's a really bad sign) it's an attempt to reinvigorate its mail product. Even if you thought only your grandmother still had an AOL address, according to the press release mail "represents 45 percent of the page views on the AOL network today."

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